CFP (deadline extension): Imperial Legacies of 1919 (Denton, April 2019)

Due to popular demand (finals, holidays, etc.) we are extending the paper and panel proposal submission deadline for the “Imperial Legacies of 1919” conference at UNT by one week (now January 9, 2019). 

Conference details: April 19-20, 2019. University of North Texas (Denton, TX). Keynote speakers: Shrabani Basu and Susan Kingsley Kent.

E-mail proposals to imperial1919unt@gmail.com

DEADLINE EXTENSION Imperial 1919 UNT January 9

Due to popular demand (finals, holidays, etc.) we are extending the paper and panel proposal submission deadline for the “Imperial Legacies of 1919” conference at UNT by one week (now January 9, 2019). 

Conference details: April 19-20, 2019. University of North Texas (Denton, TX). Keynote speakers: Shrabani Basu and Susan Kingsley Kent.

E-mail proposals to imperial1919unt@gmail.com

DEADLINE EXTENSION Imperial 1919 UNT January 9

Due to popular demand (finals, holidays, etc.) we are extending the paper and panel proposal submission deadline for the “Imperial Legacies of 1919” conference at UNT by one week (now January 9, 2019). 

Conference details: April 19-20, 2019. University of North Texas (Denton, TX). Keynote speakers: Shrabani Basu and Susan Kingsley Kent.

E-mail proposals to imperial1919unt@gmail.com

Re: Film Review--Peter Jackson's "They Shall Not Grow Old"

I saw the movie with a male friend (some of the imagery is pretty rough, and probably not suitable for more sensitive types, including my dear wife).
I was taken with three things, to wit:
First, the pretty astounding technical accomplishment of taking 100 year old movies and making them look completely modern, even in quite authentic-looking color. I saw the 3-D version; the effect was subtly done, but is a no less astonishing technical achievement. Watching and hearing some of the subjects speak (these were silent films!) was yet another subtle but stunning feat.

Film Review--Peter Jackson's "They Shall Not Grow Old"

All:   My wife, oldest son (army vet) and I went and viewed Peter Jackson's documentary film in a special showing in Kansas City last night at a local theater (it was a special showing and tickets had to be ordered onhline in advance).

I will not say too much about how the film came to be made and Jackson's choices,  he does a more than wonderful job of explaining things both at the beginning of the film as well as in a must see "documentary of the documentary" after the credits for the main event are finished rolling.

X-Post: Conference Report "Science / War / Technology / The Military. Surveying Complex Relationships. 59th International Conference for Military History and Social Sciences"

X-Post from H-Soz-Kult:

Egor Lykov: Tagungsbericht: Science / War / Technology / The Military. Surveying Complex Relationships. 59th International Conference for Military History and Social Sciences, 11.09.2018 – 13.09.2018 Potsdam, in: H-Soz-Kult, 06.12.2018, <www.hsozkult.de/conferencereport/id/tagungsberichte-7997>.

Re: Final Installment of World War I Symposium November 2018

Industrial/economic mobilization may have proceeded under "voluntary" means (kind of like FDR's National Recovery Administration relied on the voluntary cartelization of industry), but as noted, the main thing the US contributes to the war is bodies in uniform. This obviously relied on the draft. As Jeanette Keith has shown, this was resisted in many cases, sometimes violently. In many of those cases uniforms were definitely present in the rural Southern countryside. The Espionage Act of 1917 and the Sedition Act of 1918 also criminalized dissent.

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