ANN: Book Announcement: Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games

H-World members may be interested in my new book Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games.  The book is available from UPM (Caribbean Studies Series) at https://www.upress.state.ms.us/Books/S/Slave-Revolt-on-Screen.

Draft Syllabus: The US and the World in the Long 1960s

In the spirit of knowledge-sharing, I would like to share the draft syllabus that I put together last Fall for an undergraduate "US and the World" course. The syllabus was an assignment for the "Teaching Practicum" course I took in my second year of the World History PhD program at Northeastern University. I've omitted the introductory text (such as class policies) and included below the readings and assignments I devised for each week. 

Breaking History Podcast: Conversations with Dr. Cameron Blevins and Dr. Laura Frader

The Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association has published two new episodes of the Breaking History podcast: conversations with professors Cameron Blevins and Laura Frader. Enjoy! - Adam Tomasi, second-year PhD student in history at Northeastern, podcast director


https://soundcloud.com/user-526344395/episode-37-cameron-blevins

CFP: The Environment in World History

World History Connected, a 14-year-old affiliate of the World History Association published by the University of Illinois Press, is seeking papers for a special issue on environmental/ecological lenses to approaching World History.  Potential topics could include research in the role of the environment and environmental changes in World History; sustainability and the preservation of nature in World History; or the "Anthropocene" and World History.  Also welcome: innovative pedagogical approaches to incorporating these topics into World History courses at all levels of instruction.

History for the 21st Century - CFP (Teaching)

Have you been re-thinking how you teach world history? Did you rise to the challenge of our times by opening a new portal to the past for your students, one that also helps them acquire the skills that only the study of world history can teach them? Is there something you have been working on for years, or a fresh new idea that you’re really proud of?

 

Subscribe to RSS - world history teaching