HOME/BREWED: How the Chr. Heurich Brewing Co. Witnessed DC History November 16, 2108 from 7-9pm

HOME/BREWED: How the Chr. Heurich Brewing Co. Witnessed DC History.

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On Friday, November 16, from 7-9pm, the Heurich House Museum will unveil HOME/BREWED: How the Chr. Heurich Brewing Co. Witnessed DC History. The exhibit, which will be housed in the museum’s Carriage House Gallery, features a collection of over 1,000 items including bottles, cans, signs, and branded objects of every kind from the brewery’s existence between 1872 and 1956. 

Rabbis Under Arrest: Jewish Historical Society Annual Meeting and Program

Rabbis Under Arrest
Program & Annual Meeting 

Sunday, December 9, 2018, 3pm-5pm

With the Capitol and National Mall as backdrop, Washington rabbis have risked arrest to support causes ranging from civil rights to Soviet Jewry and immigration. A distinguished panel of local rabbis will share their experiences as we reflect on this unique intersection of secular and religious life. 

Forgotten Epidemic: A Century Ago, DC Lost Nearly 3,000 Residents to Influenza

The Forgotten Epidemic: A Century Ago, DC Lost Nearly 3,000 Residents to Influenza

“It's not forgotten because it was never remembered. You have to remember something to forget it.”

WRITTEN BY ELLIOT WILLIAMS | PUBLISHED ON OCTOBER 31, 2018

Book Talk: "Lost Farms and Estates of Washington, D.C."

Book Talk: "Lost Farms and Estates of Washington, D.C."

 

Kim Prothro Williams, author and national register coordinator, DC Historic Preservation Office

Washington, D.C., has a rural history of agrarian landscapes and country estates. In 1791, the area was selected as the capital of a new nation, and the change from rural to urban was both dramatic and progressive. Author Kim Prothro Williams reveals the rural remnants of Washington's past. 

Re: Blog post: Adam Costanzo – Interview with a Washington DC History Author

Nice to see another book on DC's early days, but I think the suggestion that Jefferson had qualms with L'Enfant's grand design is off base. Once Jefferson heard the price Washington negotiated for the land, he encouraged L'Enfant to get as much land as he could for the public. Jefferson wanted a Capitol for the ages and promised to share drawing of private mansions that he had collected in Europe.

District of Columbia’s first 4th of July – 1801

District of Columbia’s first 4th of July – 1801

BY Matthew B. Gilmore

https://matthewbgilmore.wordpress.com/2018/07/03/district-of-columbias-first-4th-of-july-1801/

The July 4th holiday has not always been recognized as a national holiday (only since 1870) but observations began in the District of Columbia since its earliest days.

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