H-Diplo Roundtable XXI-34 on Offenbach. The Conservative Movement and the Vietnam War: The Other Side of Vietnam

H-Diplo Roundtable XXI-34

Seth Offenbach.  The Conservative Movement and the Vietnam War:  The Other Side of Vietnam.  New York:  Routledge, 2019.  ISBN:  9780367209544 (hardback, $155.00).

30 March 2020 | https://hdiplo.org/to/RT21-34
Roundtable Editors:  Thomas Maddux and Diane Labrosse | Production Editor: George Fujii

Contents

Correction: Edwin Moise's comment Re: H-Diplo Essay 198- Robert Jervis on Learning the Scholar's Craft

Professor Jervis said that during the Vietnam War, the question of the morality of the war looked “complicated,” to him, and he does not say that he came up with a clear answer to that complicated question. To me the question also looked complicated, but the answer still seemed relatively simple.

Re: H-Diplo Essay 198- Robert Jervis on Learning the Scholar's Craft

Comment in response to Kristie Macrakis's review of Kevin P. Riehle. “Early Cold War evolution of British and US defector policy and practice,” https://hdiplo.org/to/AR935

Professor Jervis said that during the Vietnam War, the question of the morality of the war looked “complicated,” to him, and he does not say that he came up with a clear answer to that complicated question. To me the question also looked complicated, but the answer still seemed relatively simple.

Neutralization as a possible solution for Vietnam in Robert Jervis's essay on Learning the Scholar's Craft

In his recent essay, "How I Got Here," Professor Jervis suggested that during the Vietnam War, there were opponents of the war who believed that “the marvelous solution of neutralization was available.” I have no clear memory of what I thought on the question of neutralization at that time, but what I now believe is: The main problem with the proposal of neutralization as a solution for Vietnam was not so much that the solution was unattainable as that the proposal was usually presented in a form so vague as to be essentially meaningless.

Anti-War and Anti-Militarism Movements on Film

Today we highlight our collection of anti-war and anti-militarism films, from history films about the Philippine-American War and World War II, to our newsreels about the Anti-Vietnam War movement, to contemporary documentaries about anti-war movements in the U.S. territories of Guam and Puerto Rico. 

Philippine-American War

Memories of a Forgotten War

Camilla Benolirao Griggers/Sari Lluch Dalena, 2002, 57 min., US/The Philippines

Anti-War and Anti-Militarism Movements on Film

 

Today we highlight our collection of anti-war and anti-militarism films, from history films about the Philippine-American War and World War II, to our newsreels about the Anti-Vietnam War movement, to contemporary documentaries about anti-war movements in the U.S. territories of Guam and Puerto Rico. 

Philippine-American War

Memories of a Forgotten War

Camilla Benolirao Griggers/Sari Lluch Dalena, 2002, 57 min., US/The Philippines

Re: Flanagan on Myers, 'The Pacific War and Contingent Victory: Why Japanese Defeat Was Not Inevitable'

> I recall reading in Ernest R. May's book "Strange Victory: Hitler's Conquest of France" about attempts of the US Army to
> recreate the 1940 Low countries campaign via computer simulations, and how only direct human intervention allowed
> the Germans to win over the Allies. That is probably the closest one can get in testing the hypothesis of whether Japan
> could win the war.
>
> Stephen Satkiewicz

Re: Flanagan on Myers, 'The Pacific War and Contingent Victory: Why Japanese Defeat Was Not Inevitable'

I think it is worth noting that it was the Japanese expansion into South EAst Asia, particularly Indochina that put USA on a war path. Wlater LaFeber commented in his Roosevelt, Churchill & Indochina" " Japan's decision to changev the status quo in nSoutheast Asia by invading Indochina was perhaps the crucial factor that caused war between the United States and Japan>"It was on 25 July 1941 when FDR decided to freeze Japan;s assets in USA because Japan was making demands for air bases and the right to station 50,000 troops in Vietnam.
Walter McIntosh
Bluff, NZ

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