From Twitter

Making the rounds this week in the twittersphere was Tamara Lanier's lawsuit against Harvard University over the ownership of daguerreotypes of slaves stored at the university's museum. Published by The New York Times, Anemona Hartocollis's article "Who Should Own Photo's of Slaves? The Descendants, not Harvard, a Lawsuit Says," explores how the Lanier family's lawsuit could redefine what reparations for American slavery might look like.

From Twitter

In the twittersphere this week, The New York Times celebrated historian Paul Gilory who recently won the Norwegian Holberg Prize. Written by Jennifer Schuessler, the article "Paul Gilroy, Scholar of the Black Atlantic, Wins the Holberg Prize," highlights Gilroy's contributions to the study of race and slavery, including his magnum opus The Black Atlantic. Read more, here: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/14/arts/paul-gilroy-holberg-prize.html

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, scholars honored International Women’s Day by highlighting the remarkable lives of women such as Harriet Tubman. Published by History Extra, Sophie Beal’s article “Harriet Tubman and the ‘Underground Railroad,’” tells the story of Tubman’s life, from escaping slavery in 1849 to her participation in the Underground Railroad and the American Civil War.

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, Erica Armstrong Dunbar and Tiya Miles, co-winners of the 2018 Frederick Douglass Book Prize, discuss their individual processes of research and writing. Published by The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and moderated by Jim Knable, Dunbar and Miles's conversation also explores the concept of souls in the study of slavery. Read more, here: https://medium.com/@gilderlehrman/talk-of-souls-in-slavery-studies-c41e6c893a4f

From Twitter

This week in the Twittersphere, Peniel Joseph's article "Why this Year's Black History Month is Pivotal" reminds us that this year, 2019, marks the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans brought to the British colonial America.

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, an unusual letter found in the manuscript collections at the Library of Congress made the spotlight. Explored by historian Adam Rothman in his article “’My Dear Master:’ An Enslaved Blacksmith’s Letter to a President,” the letter provides a glimpse into the life and political awareness of one enslaved man during the mid-nineteenth century.

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, the story of Margaret Garner, an enslaved woman living in the early nineteenth-century, was published in The New York Times. Written by Rebecca Carroll, the article provides insight into Garner's life, which served as the inspiration behind Toni Morrison's novel Beloved.  It is part of a series of obituaries bringing attention to remarkable black men and women whose deaths remained largely invisible from the public record. From Garner's story of enslavement to Mary Ellen Pleasant, a former slave who became a Gold Rush-era billionaire, this o

From Twitter

This week in the Twittersphere, Bryan Stevenson discusses America’s unresolved past in relation to the First Step Act, a prison-reform bill passed by Congress in early January. Interviewed by Jamie Lowe and published by The New York Times Magazine, Stevenson draws connections between slavery, mass incarceration, and racial ideology.

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