From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, William and Mary College selected a design for a future memorial dedicated to recognizing the university’s role in the history of slavery.

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, Georgetown University observed Washington D.C.'s  Emancipation Day through a series of events focusing on historical documentation and reclaiming narratives of slavery and the Civil War. One of the events focused on the transcription of materials from the slavery archives. Learn more, here: https://www.georgetown.edu/news/emancipation-day-celebration-includes-historical-record-tr...

From Twitter

Reparations for slavery was an important topic of discussion in the Twittersphere this week. Published by Politico Magazine, Jesús A. Rodríguez’s article “This Could Be the First Slavery Reparations Policy in America,” explores the evolution of Georgetown University’s student activism calling for reparations.

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, new findings suggest Cudjo Lewis was not the last living survivor of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Published by The New York Times, Sandra Garcia’s, “She Survived a Slave Ship, the Civil War, and the Depression. Her Name Was Redoshi,” highlights historian Hannah Durkin’s research on the subject.

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, 15 Minute History released a new podcast episode hosted by Joan Neuburger and featuring historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers. The episode, “Slave Owning Women in the Antebellum U.S. South,” explores the role of southern white women to the history of enslavement.

From Twitter

Making the rounds this week in the twittersphere was Tamara Lanier's lawsuit against Harvard University over the ownership of daguerreotypes of slaves stored at the university's museum. Published by The New York Times, Anemona Hartocollis's article "Who Should Own Photo's of Slaves? The Descendants, not Harvard, a Lawsuit Says," explores how the Lanier family's lawsuit could redefine what reparations for American slavery might look like.

From Twitter

In the twittersphere this week, The New York Times celebrated historian Paul Gilory who recently won the Norwegian Holberg Prize. Written by Jennifer Schuessler, the article "Paul Gilroy, Scholar of the Black Atlantic, Wins the Holberg Prize," highlights Gilroy's contributions to the study of race and slavery, including his magnum opus The Black Atlantic. Read more, here: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/14/arts/paul-gilroy-holberg-prize.html

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, scholars honored International Women’s Day by highlighting the remarkable lives of women such as Harriet Tubman. Published by History Extra, Sophie Beal’s article “Harriet Tubman and the ‘Underground Railroad,’” tells the story of Tubman’s life, from escaping slavery in 1849 to her participation in the Underground Railroad and the American Civil War.

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, Erica Armstrong Dunbar and Tiya Miles, co-winners of the 2018 Frederick Douglass Book Prize, discuss their individual processes of research and writing. Published by The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and moderated by Jim Knable, Dunbar and Miles's conversation also explores the concept of souls in the study of slavery. Read more, here: https://medium.com/@gilderlehrman/talk-of-souls-in-slavery-studies-c41e6c893a4f

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