Re: How Did Colonial Printers Profit from Slavery?

Hi John and Michael,

Thank you very much for your responses. I will definitely be checking out the resources you both suggested.

Michael, do you have contact info for Graham Russell Hodge? You can email me privately if you need to at gordon@gardenstatelegacy.com.

Thanks again!

Gordon Bond
www.GardenStateLegacy.com

Re: How Did Colonial Printers Profit from Slavery?

Hi, Gordon. Yes, there were enslaved printers who did much more than menial tasks. Peter Fleet was a man enslaved by a Boston printer named Thomas Fleet. Fleet printed the Boston Evening Post in the 1740s and 50s. Peter Fleet, although enslaved, was the newspaper's woodcut artist and engraver.

You can learn more about Peter Fleet and his sons, Pompey and Caesar, from an online documentary I worked on here: https://peoplenotproperty.hudsonvalley.org/more-stories-about-family.php

Re: How Did Colonial Printers Profit from Slavery?

Hi Gordon,

In addition to the intellectual resources we have on hand in this former-listserv forum, which I hope will provide you some insight, you might consider joining the still-an-actual-listserv of SHARP - the Society for the History of Authorship, Readers, and Publishing. They are an incredibly generous and knowledgeable bunch on anything related to the printed word.

You can find information on them here: https://www.sharpweb.org/main/sharp-l/

Cheers,

John

How Did Colonial Printers Profit from Slavery?

I am working on a book about the relationship between Benjamin Franklin and his business partner and friend, James Parker. As some of you may know, Parker established the first permanent print shop in New Jersey at his native Woodbridge around 1752. Among the areas I am exploring are how both men had owned slaves. Parker was in New York City in 1741, for example, and may have been around for at least parts of the so-called slave conspiracy. Later, Parker would pay off a debt to Franklin by sending him a slave named George.

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