Re: H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: Transnational History and the GAPE

I incorporate transnational ideas when I teach the Progressive Era by leaning on the scholarship of Daniel R. Rodgers. As explained by Rodgers, many American Progressives were inspired by similar reformers in Europe, especially Germany and Britain. For example, I often use Frederic Howe's "The German and the American City" to show my students how Progressives often compared conditions in the United States with those in Europe in order to make their arguments.

H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: Transnational History and the GAPE

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week! Each Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

If you'd like to submit a question to be asked in a future week, please contact the H-SHGAPE Editor-In-Chief, Chelsea C. Gibson via email:  cgibson2@binghamton.edu

Re: H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: Teaching Techniques

I have used one of Barnard's "Reacting to the Past" games on Greenwich Village in the 1910s, and it was a tremendous success among students. I can't recommend it enough. This type of simulation games takes a few classes out of the syllabus so I don't know if they are appropriate for the survey, but they worked excellent for a class on industrial America. They have a few games that can be relevant to GAPE, and their platform is easy to use and understand.

H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: Teaching Techniques

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week! Each Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

Re: H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: GAPE Films

It's a bit late period-wise, but I enjoy using Inherit the Wind (1960), especially when I'm teaching about Progressive Era oratory. It's the only serious treatment of William Jennings Bryan on film, that I know of at least; Fredric March captures Bryan's visual characteristics in exhaustive detail, but unfortunately muffs the voice entirely.

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