Re: QOTW - Students & the GAPE

I have actually found that students are much more likely to be critical of our current financial and political system than they were three or four years ago. Some of this, I think, is because Bernie Sanders raised the profile of socialism, and also because his campaign targeted so many issues that reformers tackled during the GAPE. I recently, for instance, had a student who was a member of a lifeguard's labor union and the whole class was fascinated by his experience and connected it to our discussions of the WTUL, etc.

Re: QOTW - Students & the GAPE

I've noticed that too. It's the same with "well unions were a good idea back in the day but they're not needed today." I think it's only marginally related to what actual working & living conditions are today; I think it's mostly that the kids have learned in their history classes that things were bad in the past (because that allows us to tell a story about how things get better and better) and those have come with some concrete examples, whereas they haven't heard that much about what things actually are like today.

Re: QOTW - Students & the GAPE

I have noticed that students seem to be much more sympathetic to the plight of workers and immigrants who lived during the GAPE than they are towards the problems facing workers and immigrants today. Even conservative/libertarian students tend to agree that working and living conditions were unacceptable during the GAPE. I am not certain why this is the case, but I suspect that this is partially due to the fact that material living conditions for workers and immigrants are generally better today than they were during the GAPE.

QOTW - Students & the GAPE

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week! Every other Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

 

H-SHGAPE QOTW: SHGAPE at the OAH 2019

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week!

Every other Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

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H-SHGAPE QOTW: Tariffs in the late 19thc

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week!

Every other Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

This week's question:

Re: H-SHGAPE QOTW: Immigration in the GAPE

I find Jacob Riis's photographs in How the Other Half Lives to be very helpful primary sources when I teach about the immigrant experience (and/or social reform movements) during the GAPE. Most students seem to have a thorough understanding of the "push" and "pull" factors of migration as well as what it was like for immigrants who were processed at Ellis and/or Angel Island.

H-SHGAPE QOTW: Immigration in the GAPE

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week! Each Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

This week's question:
 

Re: SHGAPE QOTW: Regional studies

Yes, regional studies remain very important to the field of Gilded Age and Progressive Era studies. For example, Heather Cox Richardson's monograph West from Appomattox: The Reconstruction of America After the Civil War innovatively incorporates developments on the western frontier into the history of Reconstruction as well as the broader story of the emergence of the United States as a great power at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Re: SHGAPE QOTW: Regional studies

I think the field has come a long way from the days when most of the emphasis was on the industrial east, with an occasional nod to populism in the south and midwest. Amy Louise Wood's essay "The South," and Thomas Jablonsky's "The Midwest and Far West During the Gilded Age and Progressive Era," (both in the Wiley Blackwell Companion to the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, edited by Christopher McKnight Nichols and Nancy C. Unger, 2017) offer extensive historiographies of the crucial work in these regions that adds immeasurably to the field.

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