Re: Query about Roman teachings as reflected in Byzantine/Slavic polemics

I am not sure that the term "Catholic Christianity" is the most appropriate while dealing with 10th-Church history, particularly when it comes to Latin-Byzantine relationships. Granted, the monks who composed the Chronicle lived in a world where the wedge between Orthodoxy and Catholicism was a thing, but this wasn't necessarily the case when it comes to Vladimir's time: consciously or not, they projected their own religious convictions on to their clumsy historical overview.
As for the question on 1 Corinthians, I am afraid I can't be of much help. :-/
Best,

Re: Query about Roman teachings as reflected in Byzantine/Slavic polemics

From Dmitrii Dobrovolski, HSE Moscow:

Almost every Old Rusian anti-Latin polemic text deals with the problem of food restrictions allegedly misunderstood or misused by Catholics.
However, as far as I know, this very biblical quote wasn’t used in such a context anywhere but in the story of Vladimir’s conversion.
Answer to: ddobrowolski@zoho.com

Query about Catholic teachings as reflected in Byzantine/Slavic polemics

In the Russian Primary Chronicle, the Catholics who come to convince Vladimir of Kiev to adopt Catholic Christianity present their (main) 'teaching' as "Whatever one eats or drinks, it is for the glory of God". This, obviously, resonates 1 Corinthians 10:31, but I wonder if any other medieval texts uses this specific 'commandment', especially in Latin/Byzantine polemics. Thank you!

Query about Roman teachings as reflected in Byzantine/Slavic polemics

In the Russian Primary Chronicle, the Catholics who come to convince Vladimir of Kiev to adopt Catholic Christianity present their (main) 'teaching' as "Whatever one eats or drinks, it is for the glory of God". This, obviously, resonates 1 Corinthians 10:31, but I wonder if any other medieval texts uses this specific 'commandment', especially in Latin/Byzantine polemics. Thank you!

Re: Did German jets really run on diesel?

In Germany; in the initial conceptual stages, especially during design and prototype manufacturing and testing stage, jet engines used “gas”. That is; hydrogen and propane gas. Maybe that is why they are referred as “gas turbine powerplants”. Joke aside; one of the advantages voiced for jet engines in 1938 was “use of cheap home-produced fuels”. The widely used jet engine on the Me-262 jet fighter, the Jumo 004, “was developed from the outset to burn diesel oil”.

Re: Did German jets really run on diesel?

Gas turbines, including jet engines, will run on almost anything (including powdered coal), given appropriate fuel metering & combustor details, since combustion is continuous rather than intermittent. All you really need is a heat source (hence US military work on nuclear-powered aircraft in the 1950s--a small reactor would have provided the energy source). The generic label kerosene applied to both diesel fuel and commercial and military grades of jet fuel. I don't recall details about German jets in WW II, but presumably was some variety of kerosene.

Did German jets really run on diesel?

Making Jet Engines in World War II: Britain, Germany, and the United States, by Hermione Giffard, is an unusual study of World War II aviation in that it almost ignores combat, and concentrates on engine production.  The traditional story of jets in the war is that Germany—despite being bombed, and under increasing economic pressure of all kinds—managed to put the Me-262 fighter and the Ar-234 bomber into the air, and into combat. Both were much faster than any Allied plane.

QUERY: Digitized resources on history of DDR foreign cultural policy

For a research project on the history of cultural treaties (bi-lateral and sometimes multi-lateral agreements promoting and/or regulating cultural exchange between states), I have been looking for digitized versions of the cultural treaties of the German Democratic Republic.

Query: Master Thesis on 'The United States and Eurafrica Project' (1950-1960s)

Dear scholars, 

As I'm currently just starting my master thesis on 'The United States and the Eurafrica Project' (1950-1960s), I'm looking for ideas about US perception of the project ( How was it documented in US publications for example ? Links/correspondences between African American intellectual and African intellectual). Thus, I was wondering if any of you would have useful recommendations for me. Thank you a lot and all the best, 

Margaux Guigal

The Graduate Institute in Geneva. 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Query