Re: Confederates in the Time of Coronavirus: Walking Richmond's Avenue of Broken Dreams During the Pandemic

It is unclear what "mentality" you've uncovered here, as the essay really has no thesis, simply reflecting a contemplative stroll down the street weeks before the explosion of protests. It's really a "calm before the storm" in many ways that demonstrates how quickly things can change. Note the lack of visitors to the Lee monument then, versus the very brilliant and exciting contextualization and reclamation of the space that is going on now.

Re: Confederates in the Time of Coronavirus: Walking Richmond's Avenue of Broken Dreams During the Pandemic

This essay reflects much of the mentality of the Civil War history profession. The fact that arguments like this are still made by persons in the field of Civil War history and that there is an expectation by the persons making these arguments that it will be credible to others specializing in Civil War history is a powerful statement about the Civil War historical profession. I printed out both hard copies and made a PDF since I think it is an important documentation of the mentality of the people in Civil War history.

Confederates in the Time of Coronavirus: Walking Richmond's Avenue of Broken Dreams During the Pandemic

H-CivWar readers, I'm proud to present a unique essay by author Ben Cleary, a native of Richmond, Virginia, and a former National Park Service interpretive ranger at the Richmond National Battlefield Park.

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