Josephine Henry to Laura Clay, Jan. 19th [18]99, Laura Clay Papers, Box 6, folder 19, University of Kentucky Special Collections and Research Center

Title: Letter from Josephine Henry to Laura Clay, Jan. 19th [18]99

Repository: 46m4: Laura Clay Papers, Box 6, folder 19, University of Kentucky Special Collections and Research Center, Lexington, KY

Clay, Mary Barr. [Speech before U.S. House Judiciary Committee, March 8, 1884] in "Congressional Hearings and Reports of 1884," History of Woman Suffrage, Vol IV. Susan B. Anthony & Ida Husted Harper, eds. (Susan B. Anthony, 1902), 44-45.

Author: Clay, Mary Barr.

Title: [Speech before U.S. House Judiciary Committee, March 8, 1884] in "Congressional Hearings and Reports of 1884," The History of Woman Suffrage, Vol IV. Susan B. Anthony & Ida Husted Harper, eds.

Publisher: Susan B. Anthony, 1902

Pages: 44-45.

Laura Clay (1849-1941), Kentucky Suffragist and Voice of the South

Laura Clay (February 9, 1849 — June 29, 1941) grew up in a large family of activists at a farm in Madison County. Her father, Cassius Clay, was a friend of Abraham Lincoln and ambassador to Russia. Her mother, Mary Jane Warfield Clay, and her sisters all supported the woman suffrage movement, and farming kept them economically independent as they went on in life, whether divorced or married.

Connections between Kentucky and Tennessee - history of woman suffrage and voting rights today

KY Woman Suffrage

This post was co-written by Dr. Randolph Hollingsworth (coordinator for the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Project) and Dr. Margaret Spratt (coordinator for the Tennessee entries for the Women and Social Movements in the U.S. project on woman suffrage) as they consider a proposal to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a community outreach project to include both Kentucky and Tennessee:

Mary Barr Clay

The eldest daughter of a large family, Mary Barr was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on October 13, 1839, to Mary Jane Warfield and Cassius M. Clay. In 1866 Clay married Major John Francis “Frank” Herrick, of Cleveland, Ohio. They had three sons and then they divorced in 1872. She took back her surname of Clay and changed the last names of her two youngest children to Clay also.

Twenty-First Annual KERA Convention

The twenty-first annual convention of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association is held in Covington. Officers elected at this convention are: Laura Clay (President), Mary Barr Clay (First Vice-President), Mary C. Cramer (Second Vice-President), Nancy Sanford McLaughlin (Third Vice-President), Mary C. Roark (Corresponding Secretary), Emma M. Roebuck (Recording Secretary), and Isabella H. Shepard (Treasurer). For the coming year, the organization plans to sponsor suffrage essays contests, push for an amendment to the state constitution allowing full suffrage, and establish a Lecture Bureau.

Nineteenth Annual KERA Convention

The nineteenth annual convention of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association is held in Richmond. Officers for the year include: Laura Clay (President), Mary Barr Clay (First Vice-President), Mary C. Cramer (Second Vice-President), Nancy Sanford McLaughlin (Third Vice-President), Mary C. Roark (Corresponding Secretary), Emma M. Roebuck (Recording Secretary), Isabella H. Shepard (Treasurer), Eliza C. Obenchain (Press Work), Mattie Bruce Reynolds (Historian) and Mary E. Giltner (Member of Executive Committee of NAWSA).

Eighteenth Annual KERA Convention

The eighteenth annual KERA convention is held in Richmond. Officers are: Laura Clay (President), Mary Barr Clay (First Vice President), Mary Cramer (Second Vice President), Nancy Sanford McLaughlin (Third Vice President), Mary Creegan Roark (Corresponding Secretary), Emma M. Roebuck (Recording Secretary), Isabella H. Shepard (Treasurer), Mattie B. Reynolds (Historian), Eliza Calvert Obenchain (Press Work), and Mary E. Giltner (NAWSA Executive Committee Member). Local reports are received from groups in Fayette County, Madison County, Ashland, and Campbell County.

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