Josephine Henry to Laura Clay, Jan. 19th [18]99, Laura Clay Papers, Box 6, folder 19, University of Kentucky Special Collections and Research Center

Title: Letter from Josephine Henry to Laura Clay, Jan. 19th [18]99

Repository: 46m4: Laura Clay Papers, Box 6, folder 19, University of Kentucky Special Collections and Research Center, Lexington, KY

Some Members of the Kentucky Delegation to the 1920 Democratic National Convention

Photograph of some members of the Kentucky Delegation to the 1920 Democratic National Convention at which Laura Clay and Cora Wilson Stewart were nominated as candidate for President - left to right:

Debate between Laura Clay and Madeline McDowell Breckinridge over the Anthony Amendment

Debate before the Woman’s Club of Central Kentucky
October 18th, 1919
Won by the Negative - Miss Clay.

Subject:

That Both Sections of the Anthony Federal Amendment Constitute the Proper Method of Extending Suffrage to Women.

AFFIRMATIVE: Mrs. Desha Breckinridge,
President of State Equal Rights Association

Citizens Committee for State Suffrage Amendment is formed

On Wednesday, June 8, 1910, Laura Clay, Elizabeth Dunster Gibson (Mrs. H.G.) Foster, Alice Bronston Oldham, and Elizabeth Burgess McQuaid for the Citizens Committee for State Suffrage Amendment. Led by Clay, who resigned as president of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, the Citizens Committee set up headquarters at 130 North Upper Street in Lexington. The other three women resigned from the Fayette County Equal Rights Association.

Laura Clay (1849-1941), Kentucky Suffragist and Voice of the South

Laura Clay (February 9, 1849 — June 29, 1941) grew up in a large family of activists at a farm in Madison County. Her father, Cassius Clay, was a friend of Abraham Lincoln and ambassador to Russia. Her mother, Mary Jane Warfield Clay, and her sisters all supported the woman suffrage movement, and farming kept them economically independent as they went on in life, whether divorced or married.

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