Woman suffrage headquarters in Upper Euclid Avenue, Cleveland in 1912

League Of Women Voters, U.S. Records. Woman suffrage headquarters in Upper Euclid Avenue, Cleveland--A. at extreme right is Miss Belle Sherwin, President, National League of Women Voters; B. is Judge Florence E. Allen holding the flag; C. is Mrs. Malcolm McBride. Cleveland Ohio, 1912. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/97500065/.

A Look at the Nineteenth Amendment and Its History

KY Woman Suffrage

            On this day, June 4th, in 1919 the United States Senate passed the Nineteenth Amendment and presented it to the states for ratification. It read, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.

A Simple Justice: Kentucky Women Fight for the Vote by Dr. Melanie Beals Goan

KY Woman Suffrage

            When considering the women’s suffrage movement, most Americans think of iconic national figures like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. However, the fight for the right to vote was by no means monolithic.

Laura Sutton Bruce (1853 – 1904), Lexington artist, suffragist and philanthropist

Laura Sutton Bruce was born on August 16, 1853, in Lexington, Kentucky. She was the third of seven daughters of Elizabeth T. Colesberry and William W. Bruce. Her father was a wealthy man whose fortune came from hemp and bagging manufacturing, having partnered for some years with the Lexington millionaire Benjamin F. Gratz. W.W.

Randolph Hollingsworth, "African American Women Voters in Lexington's School Suffrage Times, 1895-1902: Race Matters in the History of the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Movement," Ohio Valley History 20 (Spring 2020): 30-53.

Author: Randolph Hollingsworth

Title: "African American Women Voters in Lexington's School Suffrage Times, 1895-1902: Race Matters in the History of the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Movement"

Publication: Ohio Valley History 20 (Spring 2020): 30-53.

Ann Taylor Allen, "Woman Suffrage and Progressive Reform in Louisville, 1908-1920," Ohio Valley History 20 (Spring 2020): 54-78.

Author: Ann Taylor Allen

Title: Woman Suffrage and Progressive Reform in Louisville, 1908-1920 

Publication: Ohio Valley History 20 (Spring 2020): 54-78.

N.B. This issue is available for a short time online, free and open via The Filson Historical Society website: https://filsonhistorical.org/wp-content/uploads/OVH_SPRING_20_MUSE.pdf

Melanie Beals Goan, The 'Argument of Numbers': Laura Clay and the Failure of the Kentucky Plan, Ohio Valley History 20 (Spring 2020): 9-29.

Author: Melanie Beals Goan 

Title: The 'Argument of Numbers': Laura Clay and the Failure of the Kentucky Plan

Publication: Ohio Valley History 20 (Spring 2020): 9-29.

N.B. This issue is available for a short time online, free and open via The Filson Historical Society website: https://filsonhistorical.org/wp-content/uploads/OVH_SPRING_20_MUSE.pdf

Mary Barr Clay - photo from Goodman, Bitter Harvest

Photograph of Mary Barr Clay (1839-1924) perhaps sometime in the 1870s when she was starting up her career as a suffragist - she was named after her maternal grandmother, Mary Barr Warfield. See her KWSP biosketch here: https://networks.h-net.org/node/2289/discussions/154189/mary-barr-clay

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