PhD Scholarship in Population History

The Laureate Centre for History and Population invites applications for a Laureate Doctoral Scholarship in population history. The successful candidate will join the Laureate research team, under the supervision of Professor Alison Bashford, within the School of Humanities and Languages, Faculty of Arts Design and Architecture, UNSW. The scholar may research Australian, Pacific or international history related to population, and proposals can be discussed with Alison Bashford.

Re: 21st-Century Scholars and the Otherness of the Civil War Era

Dave,
I have enjoyed reading your initial post, the responses to it, and your replies.

Your focus seems to be primarily philological. We today still use many of the words used in the Civil War era, but meanings have changed. Your description of these as "keywords" prompts me to make a suggestion. I think that it would be a great aid to students in this field if someone could produce something like Raymond Williams' KEYWORDS describing how the terms you mention and others were used at the time.

Re: 21st-Century Scholars and the Otherness of the Civil War Era

Dear Hugh and Lois, 

Thank you for your comments. A few quick replies. 

Re. Hugh's statement that: 

And that tree leaves us with the vague notion that across time, conservatives are united in the defense of existing institutions and prefer managed change that respects those institutions

Re: 21st-Century Scholars and the Otherness of the Civil War Era

Dear Dave and everyone,
I think Dave's argument crystallized most for me with a statement that I actually rather disagree with: "A diverse cohort of Civil War-era Americans magically transported to the present would not all agree with the book [Heather Cox Richardson’s How the South Won the Civil War], but they would find the terms of analysis straightforward."

Re: 21st-Century Scholars and the Otherness of the Civil War Era

Thank you, David, for a thoughtful post. The problem you bring before us is part of a difficulty that has long confronted historians. How do we convey a good sense of the past—with its different language, conceptions, culture, and so on—to the present? The particular case you raise is a philological one. In the classroom, I have dealt with this very issue—as I’m sure everybody else has.

Subscribe to RSS - Intellectual history