Re: The Myths of the "Few"

This post has some interesting threads to pull on and questions to consider.

Do we really need to expand the definition of "hero" to include the bureaucrats and rear echelon commanders? Not to say they aren't important (I was one for nearly 30 years), but shouldn't that term be reserved for the folks doing the shooting and getting shot at?

Re: The Myths of the "Few"

And as if on order, Larrie Ferraro has just published, with Oxford University Press, that makes many of these same points (e.g. David Silbey) with Churchill's American Arsenal.

As for blame, pretty broad...I would characterize the blame for credit not going where credit was due to the air power/bomber mafia and their willing enablers in the Air Ministry like Inskip--not just Churchill.

Re: The Myths of the "Few"

And as if on order, Larrie Ferraro has just published, with Oxford University Press, that makes many of these same points (e.g. David Silbey) with Churchill's American Arsenal.

As for blame, pretty broad...I would characterize the blame for credit not going where credit was due to the air power/bomber mafia and their willing enablers in the Air Ministry like Inskip--not just Churchill.

Re: The Myths of the "Few"

I quite agree, but I have to note that if the Royal Air Force is being honest with itself and us (and I haven't read the cited article yet) it would point a much more accusatory finger, not at Churchill, but at the RAF high command that pushed Dowding into retirement as soon as he had won his battle, as well as moving 11 Group commander Sir Keith Park off to a much less important command. This was one of the most epic failures of giving credit where it was due that I can think of in the whole story of the Second World War.

Re: The Myths of the "Few"

Paul Kennedy made a somewhat similar point in his Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers Who Turned The Tide in the Second World War.  He pointed to all of the critically necessary innovations that allowed the Allies to handle a lot of different challenges, done not by warriors but by scientists and engineers -- bureaucrats -- who don't necessarily get the credit they deserve.

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