Bollinger baby centennial

Tomorrow, November 12, 2015, marks the centennial of the birth of "Baby Bollinger."  Chicago surgeon Harry Haiselden decided to not perform life-saving surgery on the baby because he considered the boy eugenically unfit, and the baby died five days later.  Haiselden's actions were widely publicized, including his 1917 motion picture The Black Stork, which is also the title of my 1996 book on the resulting controversy, 

Bollinger baby centennial

Tomorrow, November 12, 2015, marks the centennial of the birth of "Baby Bollinger."  Chicago surgeon Harry Haiselden decided to not perform life-saving surgery on the baby because he considered the boy eugenically unfit, and the baby died five days later.  Haiselden's actions were widely publicized, including his 1917 motion picture The Black Stork, which is also the title of my 1996 book The Black Stork: Eugenics and the Death of "Defective" Babies in American M

Still from The Black Stork (1917)

Still from Harry Haiselden's 1917 film The Black Stork. This scene is near the end of the film. In it, the character of Dr. Haiselden (portrayed by the real-life Dr. Harry Haiselden) has just allowed a baby born with multiple birth defects to die. The shot depicts the baby's soul leaping into the arms of Jesus.

Image from npr.org (http://www.npr.org/programs/disability/ba_shows.dir/children.dir/highlights/bsmovsti.html)

CFP: Controlling Sexuality and Reproduction, Past and Present

Call for Presentations
Controlling Sexuality and Reproduction,
Past and Present

August 12-14, 2015
University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada  

Confirmed Keynote Speakers
Paul A. Lombardo http://law.gsu.edu/profile/paul-lombardo/
Dorothy E. Roberts http://law.upenn.edu/cf/faculty/roberts1/

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