CFP: “Transatlantic Conversations": SEA and Obama Institute Workshop

Call for Papers:

“Transatlantic Conversations: New and Emerging Approaches to Early American Studies”

A Workshop Jointly Sponsored and Organized by the Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies and the Society of Early Americanists

October 4-6, 2018

CFP: American Women's Writing and the Genealogies of Queer Thought (special issue of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers)

Call for Papers

“American Women's Writing and the Genealogies of Queer Thought”

Special issue of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 

Guest Editors: Travis M. Foster and Timothy M. Griffiths

Deadline: July 31, 2018

CFP: American Women's Writing and the Genealogies of Queer Thought (special issue of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers)

This special issue of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, guest-edited by Travis M. Foster and Timothy M. Griffiths, aims to address a key contradiction in the development of contemporary queer theory: on the one hand, queer intellectual history has clear though too frequently elided roots in feminism and women’s writing; and, on the other hand, many of queer theory’s most defining arguments draw inductively from astonishingly narrow archives that occlude women’s embodiment, history, desires, and experiences. We seek papers that engage this contradiction by bringing queer theoretical thought into dialogue with American women’s writing from the seventeenth century through the early-twentieth century.

New Issue of Common-place Journal Launched: Care and Dependence in Early America

At a moment when Americans are deeply divided about the role of care, and the obligations we owe to those who need it, the new Common-place (17.2) brings together a group of scholars whose work asks us to think about how age and illness have shaped the possibilities for individual and communal identity in early America.

New Issue of COMMON-PLACE Now Launched

The new issue of Common-place beckons with lively discussion of how “religion” and “politics” changed in relation to each other in the aftermath of the Revolution, with religion reshaped in the context of mass politics, and politics freighted with an expanding array of religious interests and competing visions of religion-inflected nationhood.

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