Re: Question of the Month - April

Dear All, 

Thank you for so many excellent questions, recommendations, and anecdotes. Two colleagues of mine did recently forward to me a number of stories about racist attacks on Africans in southern China tied to the recent Covid-19 pandemic. One of these is here: https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/04/15/chinas-racism-is-wrecking-its-success-in-africa/

Best wishes, 

Dave Prior

 

Re: Question of the Month - April

responding to Brian Girvin: 

I am no specialist on pandemics but as a specialist on immigration, I do know how common this kind of othering is and I can provide some background readings and a few personal insights based on family history.

For histories of U.S. immigration and health issues, first see Alan Kraut, Silent Travelers: Germs, Genes and the “Immigrant Menace.” (1994)

Re: Question of the Month - April

The entanglements between epidemics and nationalism are manifold. Nationalism is predicated on a deep, almost anthropological sense of keeping the community’s inner space “pure” in what is conceived as a contaminating world (cf. Mary Douglas’s classic “Purity and danger”). Heraclitus already, in stating that "we need to defend our laws as if they were our city walls”, equated internal order with external protection. Hence cross-border traffic, be it in the shape of human mobility, goods, or influences, is always eyed with suspicion.

Question of the Month - April

H-Nationalism’s Question of the Month series offers a forum for discussing the big questions surrounding research, pedagogy, and practice in the field of nationalism studies and the history of nationalism. Use the reply feature to join the conversation! Email Simon Purdue (purdue.s@husky.neu.edu) of Northeastern University if you’d like to propose a question of you own. If you need technical assistance with logging in and posting comments, please contact H-Net’s Help Desk (help@mail.h-net.org).  


Hello all,

CfP EASST/4S 2020 “Unpacking Food Chains: Knowledge-Making, Biotechnoscience, and Multispecies Connectivity in Troubled Societies”

Your network editor has reposted this from H-Announce. The byline reflects the original authorship.

Type: 
Call for Papers
Subject Fields: 
Anthropology, Animal Studies, Humanities, Environmental History / Studies

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