CFP: 'Walter Benjamin in the East: Networks, Conflicts, and Reception', ZfL Berlin (01.03.2022)

International Conference: Walter Benjamin in the East – Networks, Conflicts, and Reception

 

7–9 July 2022, Leibniz-Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung Berlin (ZfL)

Organizers: Caroline Adler (HU Berlin), Sophia Buck (Oxford/ZfL), Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford), Matthias Schwartz (ZfL)

CFP: 'Walter Benjamin in the East: Networks, Conflicts, and Reception', ZfL Berlin (01.03.2022)

International Conference: Walter Benjamin in the East – Networks, Conflicts, and Reception

 

7–9 July 2022, Leibniz-Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung Berlin (ZfL)

Organizers: Caroline Adler (HU Berlin), Sophia Buck (Oxford/ZfL), Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford), Matthias Schwartz (ZfL)

Nader Shah, a great military commander lost to time // Scrolls & Leaves podcast

Episode 2: The Jewels of the Maharajas

The jewels of the Maharajas symbolized power and a connection with the divine. Anyone who wanted to be a greater ruler wanted them.

When these jewels are traded on global auction markets, their histories are often lost or reduced to stories of their displacement.

Virtual Speaker Series – Joy Porter on Trauma and Indigenous Masquerade after the First World War

In this Zoom-based talk, Joy Porter (University of Hull) will recount the remarkable story of Canadian poet Frank Prewett during and after the First World War. Prewett’s brooding good looks and claims to Iroquois ancestry attracted both sexes, including British aristocrats Siegfried Sassoon and Lady Ottoline Morrell. Amidst the heady vertigo of pandemic-ridden, post-war England, this remarkable Canadian became the toast of elite British literary society—that is, until it all crashed around his ears.

Virtual Speaker Series – Joy Porter on Trauma and Indigenous Masquerade after the First World War

In this Zoom-based talk, Joy Porter (University of Hull) will recount the remarkable story of Canadian poet Frank Prewett during and after the First World War. Prewett’s brooding good looks and claims to Iroquois ancestry attracted both sexes, including British aristocrats Siegfried Sassoon and Lady Ottoline Morrell. Amidst the heady vertigo of pandemic-ridden, post-war England, this remarkable Canadian became the toast of elite British literary society—that is, until it all crashed around his ears.

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