Panelist needed for 2019 SHAFR conference

Dear colleagues,

Our 2019 SHAFR panel, "Relations between France and the United States as Colonial Empires during the Twentieth Century," scheduled for June 22, needs a replacement presenter. Interested scholars please contact Tim Roberts, the panel organizer, for additional information. Thank you.

Tim Roberts

Western Illinois University

tm-roberts@wiu.edu

CfP: Panelist replacement for 2019 SHAFR

Our 2019 SHAFR panel, "Relations between France and the United States as Colonial Empires during the Twentieth Century," scheduled for June 22, needs a replacement presenter. Interested scholars please contact Tim Roberts, the panel organizer, for additional information.

Thank you.

Tim Roberts
Western Illinois University
tm-roberts@wiu.edu

ANN: SHAFR conference commentator needed

Colleagues, A panel accepted at the upcoming conference of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), June 20-22, in Arlington, VA needs a replacement chair and commentator. The panel is "Relations between France and the United States as Colonial Empires during the Twentieth Century, scheduled for Saturday, June 22. Please contact Tim Roberts if you are interested to participate. 

Many thanks.

Tim Roberts

Professor of History

Western Illinois University

309 255 6943

tm-roberts@wiu.edu

Re: QUERY: U.S. Trade Policy with European Colonies

Dear Professor Robbins,
this is an interesting question. The answer obviously varied from empire to empire and from time to time.
I can say regarding the British empire in Asia, that it was very largely free-trade *except* the East India Company's monopoly of trade east of the Cape of Good Hope, but even that was abandoned between 1813 and 1833.
American traders were in the Indian Ocean by the 1780s and the trade flourished in the 19th century. Tariffs that existed were applied across the board until "Imperial preference" emerged in the Great Depression.

QUERY: U.S. Trade Policy with European Colonies

Hello, I am interested to learn about secondary sources that might reveal whether European powers allowed American traders to trade with their colonies on the same terms as those on trade with the metropole, or if American traders had to pay a higher tariff when trading with a colony. Likewise, did the United States allow European (or other foreign) merchants to trade with, say, Puerto Rico or the Philippines on the same terms as when conducting trade with a company in the continental United States? Any suggestions would be welcome.

Many thanks.

Sincerely,

Tim Roberts

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - comparative empires