Author Interview--Joshua A. Lynn (Preserving the White Man’s Republic) Part 2

Hello H-CivWar Readers:

Today we continue our conversation with Joshua A. Lynn to talk about his book, Preserving the White Man’s Republic: Jacksonian Democracy, Race, and the Transformation of American Conservatism, published by University of Virginia Press in April 2019 (released as a paperback in 2021).

Part 1

Re: Author Interview--Joshua A. Lynn (Preserving the White Man’s Republic) Part 1

Reading this interview and description of the Democratic Party and its politics from the 1840s, 50s, seems exactly like hearing 2020-22 so called Republican Party political advocacy and propaganda.

Noting this direct comparative sameness, quite possible this explains why some hark to Andrew Jackson as a model of historical importance.

Author Interview--Joshua A. Lynn (Preserving the White Man’s Republic) Part 1

Hello H-CivWar Readers:

Today we feature Joshua A. Lynn to talk about his book, Preserving the White Man’s Republic: Jacksonian Democracy, Race, and the Transformation of American Conservatism, published by University of Virginia Press in April 2019 (released as a paperback in 2021).

Re: 21st-Century Scholars and the Otherness of the Civil War Era

Dave,
I have enjoyed reading your initial post, the responses to it, and your replies.

Your focus seems to be primarily philological. We today still use many of the words used in the Civil War era, but meanings have changed. Your description of these as "keywords" prompts me to make a suggestion. I think that it would be a great aid to students in this field if someone could produce something like Raymond Williams' KEYWORDS describing how the terms you mention and others were used at the time.

Re: 21st-Century Scholars and the Otherness of the Civil War Era

Dear Hugh and Lois, 

Thank you for your comments. A few quick replies. 

Re. Hugh's statement that: 

And that tree leaves us with the vague notion that across time, conservatives are united in the defense of existing institutions and prefer managed change that respects those institutions

Re: 21st-Century Scholars and the Otherness of the Civil War Era

Dear Dave and everyone,
I think Dave's argument crystallized most for me with a statement that I actually rather disagree with: "A diverse cohort of Civil War-era Americans magically transported to the present would not all agree with the book [Heather Cox Richardson’s How the South Won the Civil War], but they would find the terms of analysis straightforward."

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