Re: Strange chinese character

To all the responders: Many thanks. The Ministry of Education dictionary is a fantastic resource that I din't know about, and will enthusiastically recommend to anybody interested. It shows that the 积 character does exist as a variant for 積. This raises all sorts of questions. Were enthusiastic simplifiers sticking unauthorized simplifications into their linotype fonts around 1987 or '89, or was the ms. prepared for publication before that? Were the editor(s) submitting their own handwritten simplifications to the printer?

Re: Strange chinese character

Hi Don,

You might find the ROC Ministry of Education's Dictionary of Chinese Character Variants (http://dict2.variants.moe.edu.tw/eng.htm) to be a useful source for such searches. Could the character you describe be variant #2 on http://dict2.variants.moe.edu.tw/yitia/fra/fra02944.htm ?

Best regards,
Joe

Strange chinese character

I have encountered a footnote introducing a memoir from China’s 1911 revolution, drafted presumably in 1911. Transliterated, we have the line “. . . (1911) nian suo zuo X gao” (" X draft written in the year 1911). The X is a little blurry, but appears, compared to other characters in the book, to be a simplified character composed of the grain radical on the left and the character zhi (“only”) as phonetic on the right.

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Online Chinese classes - seeking recommendations

I am seeking recommendations for a good Chinese language school which holds online classes (via skype or another video platform) at an affordable price.  The recommendation is for a beginner learner.  If you have any tips for online Chinese classes, please email me off-thread at jhinchy@ntu.edu.sg.

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Jessica Hinchy

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
 

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