Berlin-Brandenburg Colloquium for Environmental History Summer 2017

The Berlin-Brandenburg Colloquium on Environmental History provides a forum for the discussion of environmental history research in an informal setting in Berlin. We are happy to invite you to our series of talks in the summer semester 2017.

 

In order to celebrate our five year anniversary, we will kick off our semester with a special jubilee talk

 

Jubilee Talk with Award Winning

Professor KATE BROWN (American Academy Berlin / College Park, USA).

CFP: "Chernobyl – Turning Point or Catalyst? Changing Practices, Structures and Perceptions in Environmental Policy and Politics (1970s-1990s)," Berlin, Germany, Deadline 7/31/16

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Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
July 31, 2016

CFP: Chernobyl – Turning Point or Catalyst? Changing Practices, Structures and Perceptions in Environmental Policy and Politics (1970s-1990s)

Chernobyl – Turning Point or Catalyst? Changing Practices, Structures and Perceptions in Environmental Policy and Politics (1970s-1990s)

International Conference, 2 - 3 December 2016

Heinrich-Boell-Foundation (HBS), Schumannstr. 8, D-10117 Berlin, Germany

Article on OSU's "Origins" - Eating at You: Food and Chernobyl, by Kate Brown

Food was a major element of daily life in the Soviet Union, one that brought many Soviet citizens into intimate contact with the natural world on a daily basis.  However, the Chernobyl meltdown 30 year ago radically changed the nature of this relationship in Ukraine and Belarus, rending much of the region’s food supply poisonous.  Soviet historian Kate Brown, drawing on her personal experiences in and around Pripyat, shows that the legacy of the meltdown continues to cause ecological and food-supply problems and underlines t

Article on OSU's "Origins" - Eating at You: Food and Chernobyl, by Kate Brown

Food was a major element of daily life in the Soviet Union, one that brought many Soviet citizens into intimate contact with the natural world on a daily basis.  However, the Chernobyl meltdown 30 year ago radically changed the nature of this relationship in Ukraine and Belarus, rending much of the region’s food supply poisonous.  Soviet historian Kate Brown, drawing on her personal experiences in and around Pripyat, shows that the legacy of the meltdown continues to cause ecological and food-supply problems and underlines t

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