The “Majority Question” in Interwar Romania: Making Majorities from Minorities in a Heterogeneous State

H-Nationalism is proud to publish here the sixth post of its “Minorities in Contemporary and Historical Perspectives” series, which looks at majority-minority relations from a multi-disciplinary and diachronic angle. Today’s contribution, by R. Chris Davis (Lone Star College–Kingwood), examines the efforts of Romanian nation-builders to make Romanians during the interwar period.

The Pursuit of Polish Homogeneity following World War II

H-Nationalism is proud to publish here the fourth post of its “Minorities in Contemporary and Historical Perspectives” series, which looks at majority-minority relations from a multi-disciplinary and diachronic angle. Today’s contribution, by John Kulczycki (University of Illinois at Chicago), looks at the efforts of post-WW II Poland to homogenize the population of the so-called Recovered Lands in the west of the country.

The Jewish Minority in Inter-War Poland

This is the third blogpost of the “Minorities in Contemporary and Historical Perspectives” series, which looks at majority-minority relations in a multi-disciplinary and diachronic perspective. Today’s contribution, by Professor Yoav Peled (Tel Aviv University), discusses the difficult situation of the Jewish minority in interwar Poland.

 

CFP: U.S. Catholic Historian -- Immigration after 1880

U.S. Catholic Historian

Future Issue:  

The New Immigrants: Catholic Arrivals after 1880

For thirty-five years the U.S. Catholic Historian has published theme-based issues relevant to the history of American Catholicism.  An upcoming issue will address the theme of Catholic immigration from 1880 to the present. Contributions could include, but are not limited to, studies of the following:

CFP: U.S. Catholic Historian -- Immigration after 1880

U.S. Catholic Historian

Future Issue:  

The New Immigrants: Catholic Arrivals after 1880

For thirty-five years the U.S. Catholic Historian has published theme-based issues relevant to the history of American Catholicism.  An upcoming issue will address the theme of Catholic immigration from 1880 to the present. Contributions could include, but are not limited to, studies of the following:

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