What's in a name? (comment)

Also courtesy of the NCIS,here is another commentary on the dilemmas of publishing in prestigious peer-reviewed journals versus open-access publishing.  This one appeared in the "Impact of Social Sciences" blog of the London School of Economics and Political Science and  comes from Philip Moriarty who confesses to being hypocritical when he praises open access but publishes in paywalled journals and encourages his students to do so also.  The comments are worth reading as well.  Below is an excerpt and a link:

From the Web: New Books Network

Book Channel subscribers, and fans of new academic works more broadly, will be interested to discover the New Books Network. This consortium of podcasts, sponsored by Amherst College Press, posts audio interviews with authors about their new scholarly publications. With over sixty new interviews per month in dozens of academic fields, New Books Network podcasts are another great source of information about and discussion of academic books.

Further discussion of censorship in China (comment)

Friends:

Our sister H-Net network, H-Asia, has a follow-up post by Elizabeth Redden sharing links to recent comments on censorship of academic work in China and on Chinese efforts to control scholarly communication about China overseas. 

You can find the H-Asia post here:

https://networks.h-net.org/node/22055/discussions/1214218/recent-commentaries-prc-censorship-academic-publishing

New Book - A Literary Tour de France: The World of Books on the Eve of the French Revolution

Your network editor has reposted this from The H-Net Book Channel. The byline reflects the original authorship.

Author: Robert Darnton
Title: A Literary Tour de France: The World of Books on the Eve of the French Revolution

Further discussion of censorship in China (comment)

Friends:

Our sister list, H-Asia, is still discussing the agreement of Springer Nature to take down content from its journals at the request of the Chinese government.  Some academics are proposing a boycott of Springer and have created an online petition to that effect.

I wonder whether this acquiescence is different in kind from the promises that Facebook and Google are making to American officials unhappy over the proliferation of Russian "news" online.

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