Cultural Expressions of Jewish Identities, the Holocaust, and World War II

Phyllis Lassner's picture

Your network editor has reposted this from H-Announce. The byline reflects the original authorship.

Type: 
Journal
Date: 
November 15, 2020
Location: 
Illinois, United States

Cultural Expressions of Jewish Identities, the Holocaust and World War II

                           A Special issue of The Journal of Jewish Identities

                                Edited by Phyllis Lassner and Victoria Aarons

 

This special issue of The Journal of Jewish Identities invites original essays that address how cultural expressions of Jewish identity enrich, challenge, question, or affect our understanding and interpretations of the Holocaust or World War II history as well as representations of individual responses to the Holocaust. We also welcome essays that consider how the history and representation of the Holocaust or World War II affects the nature and expression of Jewish identity.

 

We encourage fluid and diverse definitions of Jewish identities that consider any of the myriad denominations, beliefs, observances, traditions, and practices that have evolved over the course of the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Significant categories of analysis include gender and sexuality, non-European Jewish identities. Comparative studies are encouraged as well, such as analyses of Jewish identity and genocide in relation to other ethnic and national identities and their collective brutalization by the Axis nations.

 

We define cultural expression as taking place in both longstanding and evolving media, including fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, life writing, graphic narratives, and comics, as well as film, documentaries, animation, television, video, and internet productions. Our focus covers the decades immediately preceding and throughout the Holocaust, World War II, and its aftermath, and we are interested in a wide range of geographies and cultures. We encourage discussions of Jewish identities in relation to Holocaust representation emanating from everywhere they were written, filmed, painted, performed, and practiced. We are open to diverse theoretical and philosophical, methodological, and interdisciplinary approaches. We particularly welcome the study of underrepresented voices in Holocaust studies. 

 

Essay length: 6,000 – 9,000 words including notes and bibliography

Please send a proposal/abstract of no more than 500 words to Phyllis Lassner <phyllisl@northwestern.edu> and Victoria Aarons <vaarons@trinity.edu> by November 15, 2020.  Queries are welcome.

 Completed essay: September 30, 2021

Fully revised manuscripts (responding to reviewer feedback):  December 1, 2021

Contact Info: 

Phyllis Lassner: phyllisl@northwestern.edu

Victoria Aarons: vaarons@trinity.edu

Categories: Journal, CFP