"Why We Fight: War, Conflict, and Community," Fourth Palmetto Connections Symposium, November 11, 2017, USC Aiken, South Carolina

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Type: 
Symposium
Date: 
November 11, 2017
Location: 
United States
Subject Fields: 
African American History / Studies, Women's & Gender History / Studies, Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies, Digital Humanities, Political Science

Why We Fight: War, Conflict, and Community

University of South Carolina Aiken

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Call for Papers

 

Palmetto Connections is an annual interdisciplinary symposium first held in 2012. This year’s event is co-sponsored by the Department of History, Political Science, and Philosophy and the Veteran and Military Success Center at the University of South Carolina Aiken. The Program Committee invites proposals for individual papers and panels for its fourth meeting, to be held Saturday, November 11, 2017.

 

This year’s theme is “Why We Fight: War, Conflict, and Community.” The year 2017 marks the centennial of America’s entrance into World War I. The Great War (1914-1918) helped shape the modern world in many ways, from the creation of new national boundaries and alliances, to the shifting of relations between labor and government, to changing understandings of war and conflict. Above all, it altered the way ordinary people thought about patriotism and citizenship, both at the national and local level. We hope to use this anniversary to initiate conversations about war, conflict, and community. Some topics to consider for the symposium include:

  • World War I
  • Recruitment & mobilization
  • The homefront
  • Role of women
  • Role of immigrants & minorities
  • Pacifism & isolationism
  • Veterans' issues
  • Science & technology
  • Literature of war
  • Public memory
  • Teaching about war
  • Digital humanities

 

The keynote speaker will be Jeanne Petit, Professor and Chair of the Department of History at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. Dr. Petit is the author of The Men and Women We Want: Gender, Race and the Progressive Era Literacy Test Debate (Rochester Press, 2010). Her most recent article is “Working for God, Country, and ‘Our Poor Mexicans’: Catholic Women and Americanization at the San Antonio National Catholic Community House, 1919-1924,” Journal of American Ethnic History (Spring 2015). Petit’s current research examines how Catholic laywomen became involved in national debates during the World War I era, as well as interfaith movements during World War I, particularly the 1918 United War Work Campaign.

 

We are interested in papers from diverse fields, including history, political science, philosophy, American studies, media studies, literature, religious studies, and sociology. We welcome the submission of complete panels as well as individual papers from faculty and graduate students.

 

Proposals should be no more than 200 words for thematic panels consisting of three or four speakers and a possible discussant. Proposals must include paper abstracts of no more than 200 words and a 250-word biography for each presenter. Individual paper proposals should include an abstract of no more than 200 words and a 250-word biography.

 

Abstracts should be received no later than August 31, 2017. Please send them to Dr. Meaghan Dwyer-Ryan at mdwyerryan@usca.edu.

 

Undergraduate Division of the Palmetto Connections Symposium

Call for Papers

The Department of History, Political Science, and Philosophy and and the Veteran and Military Success Center at the University of South Carolina Aiken invites undergraduate students from colleges and universities across the region to attend the Undergraduate Division of the Palmetto Connections Symposium and present their original research in front of a welcoming and supportive audience. Topics for papers may come from a broad range of subjects and eras—they are not limited to the symposium theme.

 

The Program Committee welcomes the submission of complete panels as well as individual papers. Panel proposals should be no more than 200 words for thematic panels consisting of three speakers, plus a possible discussant. Panel proposals must include paper abstracts of no more than 200 words, a short biography for each presenter, and a brief letter of support from their professor. Individual paper proposals should include an abstract of no more than 200 words, a short bio, and a brief letter of support from their professor.

 

Abstracts should be received no later than September 15, 2017. Please send them to Dr. Meaghan Dwyer-Ryan at mdwyerryan@usca.edu

Contact Info: 

Meaghan Dwyer-Ryan, Assistant Professor of American History, University of South Carolina Aiken

Contact Email: