New Book: Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia

Salvador Santino Regilme's picture

Dear colleagues,

My new book, Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2021), is now available in hardback and ebook formats. Please feel free to recommend it to your university/institutional libraries (also available in ebook format/or the University of Michigan Press Fulcrum Platform).

Further details are listed below. I hope that the book's focus on US military assistance on domestic state repression (including intelligence operations, etc.) would be interesting to H-Intel members.

The publisher has a 30% discount promo when it is purchased from the University of Michigan Press website. Visit https://www.press.umich.edu/12036762/aid_imperium and enter coupon code UMF21 at checkout to get 30% off your order.

Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr., Permanent University Lecturer of International Relations at Leiden University, the Netherlands

Synopsis:

Does foreign aid promote human rights? As the world’s largest aid donor, the United States has provided foreign assistance to more than 200 countries. Deploying global numerical data on US foreign aid and comparative historical analysis of America’s post–Cold War foreign policies in Southeast Asia, Aid Imperium provides the most comprehensive explanation that links US strategic assistance to physical integrity rights outcomes in recipient countries, particularly in ways that previous quantitative studies have systematically ignored. The book highlights the active political agency of Global South states and actors as they negotiate and chart their political trajectories with the United States as the core state of the international system. Drawing from theoretical insights in the humanities and the social sciences as well as a wide range of empirical documents, Aid Imperium is the first multidisciplinary study to explain how US foreign policy affects state repression and physical integrity rights outcomes in Southeast Asia and the rest of the Global South.