Seeking volunteers for a study on predictors of analytic performance

Curt Rasmussen's picture

Greetings,

My name is Curtis Rasmussen and I am a student in the Industrial-Organizational Psychology Ph.D. program at Walden University. I am seeking volunteers who conduct intelligence or risk analysis for a study on the use of thinking perspective profiles as a means of predicting intelligence analyst job performance (abstract located at the end of this posting). I am asking for your participation in this groundbreaking study, which is voluntary and anonymous. In addition, you may withdraw from the study at any time.

If you agree to participate in this study, you will receive information on the study process, as well as risks and benefits of participating. After reading through the study process and consent information you will be asked to provide biographical data consisting of gender, ethnicity, level of education (e.g., Master of Arts), and analytic experience. After filling out the biographical information you will be provided access to the International Cognitive Ability Resource test (16 questions), the MindTime Profile Inventory (45 questions), and the Self-Rated Analytic Job Performance Assessment (20 questions). Upon completing the Self-Rated Analytic Job Performance Assessment, you will have the option to provide contact information to receive your individual results. The total time it will take you to provide the required information and answer the questions will be approximately one hour.

The study can be accessed at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HK9RC7Z

The Walden University Institutional Review Board (IRB) has approved my study. If you have any questions or would like further information about the study or the IRB process you can contact me Monday through Friday, except holidays, by phone at: 701-412-7870 or e-mail: Curtis.Rasmussen@Waldenu.Edu (please include “Request for Study Information” in the subject line). You may also contact Walden University by phone regarding the IRB process at 612-312-1210. Please reference the Walden University approval number for this study, which is 10-03-17-0409978 and expires on October 2nd, 2018.

Very Respectfully,

Curtis Rasmussen

Ph.D. student, Industrial-Organizational Psychology

Walden University

701-412-7870

Curtis.Rasmussen@WaldenU.Edu


Thinking Perspective Profiles as a Predictor of Intelligence Analyst Job Performance

by

Curtis M. Rasmussen

MA, American Military University, 2012

BA, American Military University, 2009

Abstract

The evidence that supports the use of measures of general cognitive ability as a predictor of employee performance has over 100-years of supporting studies. However, for intelligence analysts, not only is cognitive ability important but so is temporal thinking. Yet to date, no studies have explored if thinking perspective profiles, as a means of identifying different temporal thinking styles, have validity as predictors of intelligence analyst job performance. To explore if thinking perspective profiles have validity as predictors of job performance, and add incremental validity to general cognitive ability as a predictor of job performance, this study incorporates a quantitative, nonexperimental design with convenience samplings. Additionally, this study includes the International Cognitive Ability Resource (ICAR) test, Self-Rated Analytic Job Performance Assessment, and the MindTime Profile Inventory to measure general cognitive ability, analytic job performance, and thinking perspective profiles, respectively. For analysis of data, multiple regression analysis will be used to assess the validity of thinking perspective profiles as predictors of job performance and incremental validity. The exploration of thinking perspective profiles as a predictor of job performance promotes positive social change by adding to the current understanding of the workings of the human mind, specifically temporal thinking and its relation to the job performance of knowledge workers; and linking industrial-organizational psychology research to cognitive and neuroscientific research.