TOC: Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol. 43, no. 1 (March 2019)

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Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies
vol. 43, no. 1 (March 2019)

Burgundian Afterlives: Appropriating the Dynastic Past(s) in the Habsburg Netherlands
Guest Editors: Steven Thiry & Anne-Laure Van Bruaene
 

Editorial

Burgundian Afterlives. Appropriating the Dynastic Past(s) in the Habsburg Netherlands (pp. 1-6)
Steven Thiry & Anne-Laure Van Bruaene

Articles

The Last Chapter of the Golden Fleece (Ghent, 1559). Burgundian Ritual, Church Space and Urban Lieux de Mémoire (pp. 7-26)
Anne-Laure Van Bruaene

Chivalric Solidarity or Royal Supremacy? The Symbolic Revival of the Order of the Golden Fleece (1566–1598) (pp. 27-46)
Steven Thiry

‘A La Mode De Bourgoigne?’ The ‘Burgundian’ Ceremonial at the Court of Albert and Isabella in Brussels (1598–1621) ((pp. 47-62))
Dries Raeymaekers

The Utility of an Empty Title. The Habsburgs as Dukes of Burgundy (pp. 63-77)
Luc Duerloo

The Gold of the Vanquished. Belgian Claims on the Order of the Golden Fleece’s Treasure in the Aftermath of the First World War (pp. 78-95)
Gilles Docquier

Abstracts

The Last Chapter of the Golden Fleece (Ghent, 1559). Burgundian Ritual, Church Space and Urban Lieux de Mémoire
Anne-Laure Van Bruaene

In 1559 the twenty-third chapter of the Golden Fleece was held in Ghent, presided over by its grandmaster King Philip II. The meeting concluded the chivalric order’s venerable tradition of organising large public ceremonies in the primary cities of the Burgundian-Habsburg lands. This contribution foregrounds the spatial arrangements for this chapter within Ghent’s collegiate church of St Bavo and discusses the positions not only of the court but also of important local players such as the church chapter, the urban magistracy, local chroniclers, and iconoclasts. The essay shows how the Habsburg dynasty systematically appropriated the interiors of the main urban churches in the Low Countries in order to highlight the continuity of Burgundian rule but at the same time broadcast a new imperial ideology. Despite these efforts, however, local audiences reinvented these spaces as important lieux de mémoire of what they perceived as traditional Burgundian rule.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03096564.2019.1559499

Chivalric Solidarity or Royal Supremacy? The Symbolic Revival of the Order of the Golden Fleece (1566–1598)
Steven Thiry

Founded in 1430, the Order of the Golden Fleece was perhaps the most iconic dynastic institution in the Low Countries. It bound together a selective group of high nobles, promoting shared values and loyalty, and was an inexhaustible storehouse of political imagery. The Dutch Revolt seriously disrupted this venerable company. Its officers became estranged, the numbers of knights rapidly declined, and original objectives were questioned. Nevertheless, the Order’s Burgundian heritage and its enduring material memory retained a strong political potential. This article explores how both royalists and dissidents exploited the signs and codes of old to criticize − and even redress − royal policy. As such the (sometimes contradictory) use of the Order’s symbolism ensured the Netherlands’ status as ritualistic nerve centre.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2018.1559505

‘A La Mode De Bourgoigne?’ The ‘Burgundian’ Ceremonial at the Court of Albert and Isabella in Brussels (1598–1621)
Dries Raeymaekers

In 1599 the Archdukes Albert and Isabella introduced a new ceremonial at their court in Brussels. Cobbled from the model that was in vogue at the royal court of Madrid, it was known as the ‘Burgundian’ ceremonial, as its origins could be traced back to the renowned court of the Dukes of Burgundy during whose reign the court of Brussels had thrived as never before. Strangely, the reforms met plenty of criticism among the courtiers, who accused the archdukes of putting aside time-honoured local traditions. The ‘Burgundian’ ceremonial was experienced by the Netherlandish nobility not only as ‘new’ but also as ‘foreign’, indicating that it was no longer recognizable as a direct derivative of the age-old tradition in Brussels. This article examines the origins of the ceremonial at the archducal court and shows how and why it came to deviate from the model that had traditionally been maintained in the Burgundian Netherlands.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03096564.2018.1559518

The Utility of an Empty Title. The Habsburgs as Dukes of Burgundy
Luc Duerloo

Although the Habsburgs never actually ruled the duchy of Burgundy, they persisted in using that ducal title from the late fifteenth until the opening years of the nineteenth century. This article explores four ways in which the title remained useful for the dynasty: to claim a preeminent place among the ruling dynasties of Europe, strengthen its position in the Holy Roman Empire, obtain diplomatic precedence, and secure its hold on the Order of the Golden Fleece. By exploring the resilience of the Burgundian claim it demonstrates the long-term importance of such empty titles in the construction of dynastic identity.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03096564.2018.1559527

The Gold of the Vanquished. Belgian Claims on the Order of the Golden Fleece’s Treasure in the Aftermath of the First World War
Gilles Docquier

One of the most brilliant symbols of the splendour of the Burgundian period remains the Order of the Golden Fleece and the ornaments which constitute its ‘treasure’, preserved since the end of the eighteenth century in Viennese museums. With the defeat of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918, some politicians and opinion makers in Belgium saw the perfect opportunity to reclaim this prestigious ensemble as a national artefact inherent to the Belgian territory. By virtue of the Treaty of Saint-Germain, the Belgian government was authorized to set up a committee in charge of demonstrating property rights to ‘national’ works of art that could be claimed as a compensation for war damages. The present contribution aims to explain who, in Belgium, militated for the restitution of the treasure of the Golden Fleece. This judicial case, abundantly covered by the contemporary press and revealing a national identity that drew upon an idealized Burgundian past, was nevertheless doomed to failure.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03096564.2018.1559528

 

Categories: Journal TOC
Keywords: Dutch Crossing, TOC