TOC: Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol. 41, no. 2 (July 2017)

Ulrich Tiedau's picture
DUTCH CROSSING: JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES
vol. 41, no. 2 (July 2017)


http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ydtc20/current

Editorial

Editorial [pp. 99-100]
Ulrich Tiedau

Articles

Gascoigne’s The Spoyle of Antwerpe (1576) as an Anglo-Dutch text
Raymond Fagel

‘Many Tongues He Must Acquire’: Anthonis de Roovere and Public Voice in the Four Rondelen
Ben Parsons & Bas Jongenelen

The Function of the Two Title Prints of the Series of Bible Prints of Romeyn de Hooghe
Dick Venemans

Antinomy of the seventeenth-century discourses between the Orient and the West, regarding the Joseon Dynasty of Korea and Hendrik Hamel of the Dutch East India Company (VOC)
Jeong-Gu Kang & Jihie Moon

Literary, Artistic and Architectural Exchange between Dutch and Polish Avant-Gardes: A Case Study in European Cultural Mobility in the 1920s and 30s
Michał Wenderski

Sketching themselves: national self-portraits in the Low Countries around 1840
Leonoor Kuijk

Herman Bavinck’s ‘My Journey to America’
James Eglinton

Abstracts

Gascoigne’s The Spoyle of Antwerpe (1576) as an Anglo-Dutch text [pp. 101-110]
Raymond Fagel


The Spoyle of Antwerpe (1576) by the English soldier poet George Gascoigne is considered both a major source on the Sack of Antwerp that took place in that same year, and a primordial example of Renaissance autobiographical writing. The finding that Gascoigne copied most of the text of his so-called witness report from a Dutch pamphlet undermines both these assumptions. As an Anglo-Dutch text, the Spoyle becomes an exciting example of cultural translation between England and the Low Countries, demonstrating how parts of an anonymous Dutch pamphlet were converted into an autobiographical English text.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2017.1291747

‘Many Tongues He Must Acquire’: Anthonis de Roovere and Public Voice in the Four Rondelen [pp. 111-119]
Ben Parsons & Bas Jongenelen


The Bruges rederijker Anthonis de Roovere has long been acknowledged as one the most important poets of the late fifteenth century. He is not only a key figure in the development of Dutch-language poetry and drama, as his work did much to formalise the characteristic poetics of the rederijkerskamers, but he attained an impressive level of recognition within his own lifetime. This article focuses on an aspect of his achievements that is often overlooked, examining the ways in which his position as stadsdichter impacted on his work, especially on the intensely public voice he often cultivated. It finds that his work not only memorialised key events within the community of Bruges but aimed to publicise and reinforce its shared values, in either case drawing traditional ecclesiastic functions into secular hands. In particular, it judges the ways in which these concerns are brought into focus by De Roovere’s four rondelen, offering a close reading of these colourful texts in terms of the priorities they articulate and the posture they assume.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2016.1139780

The Function of the Two Title Prints of the Series of Bible Prints of Romeyn de Hooghe [pp. 120-128]
Dick Venemans


The Reformation brought about an iconoclastic movement as a result of which cult images in the churches were removed and destroyed. Studying the Bible and preaching the word of God were the ways in which the new protestant faith was proclaimed. Nevertheless images, notably prints, continued to play a role throughout Europe, though exclusively at a didactic level. In the Netherlands, unlike the rest of Europe – mainly under the influence of prominent theologians of those days such as Gisbertus Voetius (1589–1676) – there were at first many objections to the use of visual arts. This changed in the course of time. At the beginning of the eighteenth century, a flourishing period arose for Dutch Bible illustrations. The famous Dutch printmaker Romeyn de Hooghe produced two series of the Bible prints, one devoted to the Old and one to the New Testament. These two series of prints were each preceded by title prints. These title prints and the explanatory texts accompanying them reveal a great deal about the use of prints in studying the Bible.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2016.1139784

Antinomy of the seventeenth-century discourses between the Orient and the West, regarding the Joseon Dynasty of Korea and Hendrik Hamel of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) [pp. 129-142]
Jeong-Gu Kang & Jihie Moon


This paper examines how the seventeenth-century discourses between the West and the Orient regarding Hamel and Joseon illustrate an antinomy whereby what is regarded as ‘true’ in one society can be defined as ‘false’ in another. Hamel who assumed that the West was superior to Joseon, encountered the antinomy in which their superior self-identity was not supported in Joseon society. However, in their Western discourse, Hamel disparaged Joseon’s people and casted them in the image of the Other who is inferior. On the other hand, Joseon considered itself as a culturally superior ‘little China’ and formed a dichotomous hierarchy with Hamel. This superior stature of Joseon was however shattered when dealing with Great Qing and Japan. In sum, the seventeenth-century discourses between the West and the Orient fall into an antinomy in which the same incident can be either true or false depending on who takes the position of the subject in the discourses.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2017.1285504

Literary, Artistic and Architectural Exchange between Dutch and Polish Avant-Gardes: A Case Study in European Cultural Mobility in the 1920s and 30s [pp. 143-159]
Michał Wenderski


This paper reflects on cultural mobility in the interwar Europe exemplified by mutual exchange between Dutch and Polish avant-garde formations such as De Stijl or Blok. Polish and Dutch groups and magazines belonged to an international, cross-border network of avant-garde writers, artists and architects who jointly struggled for new, modern art. Within this network, magazines and artists from Poland and the Netherlands were related to each other regardless of apparent cultural and linguistic boundaries – not only via other formations (e.g. French or German), but also directly based on personal contacts between particular representatives of given groups. These relationships enabled direct, mutual and reciprocal exchange of texts and reproductions of artworks and architectural projects between Polish and Dutch magazines. Based on such tangible traces, as well as private correspondence between the artists, I describe the history and the maelstroms of cultural exchange between Dutch and Polish avant-gardes, which – being part of the transnational European avant-garde network – significantly contributed to the development of modern literary, artistic and architectural thought.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2016.1139785

Sketching themselves: national self-portraits in the Low Countries around 1840 [pp. 160-179]
Leonoor Kuijk


Soon after the appearance of the English collection Heads of the People (1838) and the French series Les Français peints par eux-mêmes (1839) – anthologies of sketches depicting national types – similar volumes were produced in Belgium and the Netherlands. The genre, however, developed in different ways in the two countries. The series Les Belges peints par eux-mêmes (1839) focuses predominantly on types and characteristics that would easily be recognized by all Belgians. In contrast, the two Dutch series – De Nederlanden. Karakterschetsen, kleederdragten, houding en voorkomen van verschillende standen (beginning in 1840) and Nederlanders door Nederlanders geschetst (beginning in 1841) – introduce descriptions of many regional characters and underscore the diversity of the country and its dialects. This study describes how the editors and writers of the panoramic series in the Low Countries deployed different tools and types to make their publications ‘national’ and argues that the difference can be accounted for by a number of political and historical factors. The study also considers the relation of the Belgian and Dutch series to their British and French models.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2016.1235355

Herman Bavinck’s ‘My Journey to America’ [pp. 180-193]
James Eglinton


This travel account was written in 1892 by Herman Bavinck, then professor of systematic theology at the Theological School in Kampen, following a séjour in North America. His account of this trip deals with (i) land and nature, (ii) American culture (intentionally viewed from the bottom), (iii) towns and cities, (iv) houses and home life, (v) the character of the inhabitants, and the (vi) social, (vii) moral, and (viii) religious lives of late nineteenth century Americans.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03096564.2016.1235330

DUTCH CROSSING: JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES
ISSN‎: ‎0309-6564 (print); 1759-7854 (web)

 

 
 

 

Categories: TOC (Journal)
Keywords: Dutch Crossing