“Ordinary People” as Heroes for Hiding Jews in Nazi-Occupied Holland: Leo Ullman as a hidden child and his rescuers in Amsterdam during WWII.

Laura Morowitz's picture

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Type: 
Lecture
Date: 
April 28, 2022
Location: 
New Jersey, United States
Subject Fields: 
Jewish History / Studies, Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies, European History / Studies

APRIL 28,7 PM IN HONOR OF YOM HASHOAH 2022 Holocaust Martyrs and Heroism Day

“Ordinary People” as Heroes for Hiding Jews in Nazi-Occupied
Holland: Leo Ullman as a hidden child and his
rescuers in Amsterdam during WWII.
Leo Ullman emigrated to the U.S. in 1947. He attended Harvard College (A.B.), served in the U.S. Marine Corps and, in only three years, earned degrees at Columbia University’s Graduate Schools of Law (J.D)and Business (M.B.A.). A member of the New York Bar, Ullman practiced law for more than 30 years. He established and took to the New York Stock Exchange a real estate investment trust in 2003, for which he was named Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year in the Financial Services area. He currently heads Vastgood Properties, a private real estate company. Mr. Ullman served as a Director and later Chairman of the Anne Frank Center, USA. He presently serves as Chairman of the Foundation for the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam, Inc. and the Netherlands National Holocaust Museum. At the United States National Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., he and his wife, Kay (Katharine Lott Marbut), have co-sponsored at the exhibit “State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.” They have also funded the creation of the “Schimmel and Hoogenboom Righteous Remembrance Room” at Stockton University’s Holocaust Resource Center. Ullman chronicled his experiences as a hidden child in the book, 796 Days: Hiding as a Child in Occupied Amsterdam in World War II, and in a recent film, There Were Good People…Doing Extraordinary Deeds.
Of the approximately 145,000 Jews in Holland before WWII, an estimated 25,000 Jewish men, women and children went into hiding in the Netherlands, including 3-1/2-year-old Leo Ullmann. What motivated rescuers of all faiths to act with inherent goodness and courage despite the enormous risk? Among nearly 6,000 rescuers were Pieter Hoogenboom, a policeman in Utrecht, and his wife Evertje, and Hendrik Schimmel, a retired policeman in Amsterdam, and his wife Jannigje. In the face of almost certain death, they helped provide hiding places, false identity papers and food, and enabled limited contacts among Ullmann family members in hiding in Amsterdam and elsewhere. In 2015, the rescuers of Leo and his family were recognized by Yad Vashem as Righteous Among the Nations.
Our program with include Hebrew songs played on cello by Laura Melnicoff.

JOIN US IN PERSON AT THE WAGNER COLLEGE HOLOCAUST CENTER, 1 CAMPUS ROAD, STATEN ISLAND, NEW YORK OR VIA ZOOM

REGISTER IN ADVANCE:https://alumniconnect.wagner.edu/2022holocaustheroismday?erid=5683479&trid=0f8c4a53-19f1-4932-ba82-cb33edc35cc0

 

 

Contact Info: 

Laura Morowitz or Lori Weintrob