History of Collective Bargaining-- United Rubber Workers

Dan Nelson’s work on the URW
might be useful. I read it years ago so I don’t recall if he addresses the topics you mentioned.

Have a look at Charles A. Jeszeck "Plant Dispersion and Collective Bargaining in the Rubber Tire Industry" 242-252. According to Jeszeck, in 1945, following the success of War Labor Board mandated company-wide negotiations in 1942, the URW approached the Big 4 and offered to conduct industry-wide negotiations for the 1946 contract. Believing they held an advantage, the Big 4 agreed, but the inclusion of a re-opener clause and subsequent re-openings by the URW in late '46 and early '47 resulted in the companies rejection of industry-wide negotiations. The result was still a victory for the URW, because they were able to implement company-wide negotiations until 1967 when industry-wide negotiations returned under the leadership of Peter Bommarito.

No help from nearby Erie, PA, which had at least two plants -- Lovett Mfg. (Local 72) and Continental Rubber (Local 61) -- under contracts but to my knowledge never made an effort along that line. (Very different union & mgmt styles, among other things).

Just try to reach Dan Nelson if he is still alive and kicking. Just check for his contact list at the U. of Akron history department webpage. Dan wrote the basic history of Akron's rubber workers and the URW. He should be able to provide your answer.

Charles,

I am the Labor History Archivist at George Washington University's International Brotherhood of Teamsters Labor History Research Center. While I don't know the exact answer to your questions, we do have copies of some United Rubber Workers' contracts and agreements going as far back as 1941 in our holdings so you could look at the primary sources to see if they have the answer.
https://searcharchives.library.gwu.edu/repositories/2/archival_objects/3...
Unfortunately, Gelman Library is not open due to COVID-19. If you are interested in seeing this material, let me know and I will contact you when we reopen.

Best,
Vakil Smallen

Have a look at Charles A. Jeszeck, Plant Dispersion and Collective Bargaining in the Rubber Tire Industry, 242-252, and John L. Woods, High Stakes, Last Stands, and Fleeting Triumphs: The United Rubber Workers in the Post War Period, 1945-1976,22-26. In 1945, following the success of War Labor Board mandated company-wide negotiations in 1942, the URW approached the Big 4 rubber manufacturers and offered to conduct industry-wide negotiations for the 1946 contract.  The URW General Executive Board in their preparations for 1946 contract negotiations, decided to present their proposal simultaneously to the Big 4 in an attempt to establish pattern-bargaining in the rubber industry. "Thus, when representatives from the companies met with union negotiators on February 19, 1946, they brought the beginnings of pattern bargaining, as it would become known, to the rubber industry."(Woods, p. 25) Believing that they held an advantage, the Big 4 agreed, but the inclusion of a re-opener clause and subsequent contract re-openings by the URW in late '46 and early '47 resulted in a rejection of further industry-wide negotiations by the Big 4. Nevertheless, the result was still a victory for the URW as they were able to continue company-wide negotiations until 1967 when industry-wide negotiations returned under the leadership of Peter Bommarito.

 

 

 

Charles,

I am the Labor History Archivist at George Washington University's International Brotherhood of Teamsters Labor History Research Center. While I don't know the exact answer to your question, our holdings include copies of United Rubber Workers' contracts and agreements going as far back as 1941. The primary sources may have some indication of whether or not they were using pattern bargaining.
https://searcharchives.library.gwu.edu/repositories/2/archival_objects/32064
Unfortunately, Gelman Library is not open due to COVID-19. If you are interested in seeing this material, let me know and I will contact you when we reopen.

Best,
Vakil Smallen

Thaanks!