Hagley History Hangout/New Episode Available

Carol Ressler Lockman's picture

Education is among the largest public expenditures in the United States. How is school funding determined, and by whom? Between 1930 and 1980, teachers organized with allies to create new streams of funding to support public education, while their opponents counter-organized to reduce the ability of state governments to collect taxes and fund public services. By the end of the era, anti-tax interests have gained the ascendant, divided the pro-tax coalition, and put teachers on their back heel.  

 

Education is among the largest public expenditures in the United States. How is school funding determined, and by whom? Between 1930 and 1980, teachers organized with allies to create new streams of funding to support public education, while their opponents counter-organized to reduce the ability of state governments to collect taxes and fund public services. By the end of the era, anti-tax interests have gained the ascendant, divided the pro-tax coalition, and put teachers on their back heel.  

 

Kelly Goodman, adjunct professor at West Chester University, uncovers this tale as ti unfolded in California and Michigan with innovative archival research and original analysis. Using the National Association of Manufacturers and the United States Chamber of Commerce collections held at the Hagley Library, Dr. Goodman did real detective work to piece together the reaction against progressive taxation organized by business interests. The pro-business, anti-tax community organized systems to develop and promote model legislation, which enabled it to assume leadership over public policy decisions. 

 

The audio-only version of this program is available on our podcast.   Interview available at  https://www.hagley.org/research/history-hangout-kelly-goodman.   

 

Recorded on Zoom and available anywhere once they are released, our History Hangouts include interviews with authors of books and other researchers who have use of our collections, and members of Hagley staff with their special knowledge of what we have in our stacks. We began the History Hangouts earlier this summer and now are releasing programs every two weeks on alternate Mondays. Our series is part of the Hagley from Home initiative by the Hagley Museum and Library. The schedule for upcoming episodes, as well as those already released, is available at  https://www.hagley.org/hagley-history-hangout

                                                                                                  

Roger Horowitz

Executive Director

Hagley Center

 

Carol Ressler Lockman

Manager

Hagley Center