CFP Rethinking Early Modern Sites of Spectacle_Bordeaux Dec 2022

Jeffrey Leichman's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
April 10, 2022
Location: 
France
Subject Fields: 
Theatre & Performance History / Studies, Atlantic History / Studies, French History / Studies, Architecture and Architectural History, Digital Humanities
Dear Colleagues - 

Please circulate this call to colleagues in your own or other departments who might be interested: https://vtheatres.hypotheses.org/colloque-international-8-9-dec-2022-bordeaux .
 
The full text (English CFP followed by appel à communication en français) is also included below. Many thanks!

 

Jeffrey M. Leichman, PhD
Jacques Arnaud Associate Professor
Department of French Studies
Louisiana State University
 
***

CFP

Rethinking Early Modern Sites of Spectacle: Virtual Sources and Methods for Theatre History

Université Bordeaux-Montaigne, France • Thursday 8 December and Friday 9 December, 2022

 

International conference organized in conjunction with Virtual Theatres in the French Atlantic World: Spectacle and Urbanism (18th-19th centuries), supported by the Thomas Jeffeson Fund of the French-American Cultural Exchange (FACE) Council of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs

 

Organizers

Pauline Beaucé (Maîtresse de conférences in Theatre Studies, Université Bordeaux-Montaigne) and Jeffrey M. Leichman (Associate Professor, French Studies, Louisiana State University), with help from Louise de Sédouy (doctoral candidate, Université de Bordeaux-Montaigne).

 

Scientific Committee

Pannill Camp (Associate professor, Performing Arts, Washington University of St Louis) 

Jan Clarke (Professor of French, Durham University)

Sandrine Dubouilh (Professeure d’études théâtrales, Université Bordeaux Montaigne, Professeure à l’Ecole Nationale d’Architecture Paris Val de Seine) 

Paul François (Architecte, Ingénieur de recherche, CNRS A3M) 

Jeffrey Ravel (Professor of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Françoise Rubellin (Professeure de littérature française XVIIIe siècle, Université de Nantes) 

Cyril Triolaire (Maître de conférences en études théâtrales, Université Clermont Auvergne)

 

The international conference Rethinking Early Modern Sites of Spectacle seeks to provide an overview of new perspectives on early modern theatre history, with a specific emphasis on the study of the spaces and locations of public entertainment, their usages, their integration into city life and their place in the collective imaginary. The study of these spaces affords a privileged view not only of the material and artistic conditions of performing arts, but also of the significance for the development of an early modern urban sociability of theatrical structures and the artistic practices they housed and fostered. While study of theatrical architecture has long played an important role in theatre history, the increased accessibility of computer-based processes and digital methods has significantly impacted this aspect of the field, adding a wide variety of modeling tools to augment traditional approaches to analysis and restitution. New techniques allow researchers to visualize and comprehend the theatrical activity hosted by these sites, while also offering a vastly expanded sensory experience of long-lost spaces.

 

The main theoretical focus of this conference is encapsulated in the notion of the virtual, inasmuch as this concept not only allows for an analysis of research tools based on new technologies (virtual reality, 3D printing, video games, GIS…), but also provides an opportunity to re-think underexploited sources (e.g., plans and descriptions of virtual or never constructed theatres) as well as familiar sources in need of reevaluation (imaginaries of theatrical space in fiction, archives concerning the material life of performance). As a research paradigm in theatre historiography, the technologies and methodologies of the virtual allow us to situate this work within larger disciplinary consideration of how knowledge is mediated and transmitted, engaging questions of pedagogy, patrimonialization, and artistic creation. This in turn entails important institutional consequences, including a de-siloing of research endeavors to facilitate projects that require collaboration between scholars with vastly different competencies and sometimes divergent outcome goals. Questioning and renewing modalities of research in theatre history is thus one of the conference’s goals, alongside the elaboration of new possible models for recasting the historian’s work in a rapidly transforming higher education and research landscape.

 

This conference also serves as the conclusion of the transatlantic project Virtual Theatres in the French Atlantic World: Spectacle and Urbanism (18th-19th centuries), financed by the Thomas Jefferson Fund of the French-American Cultural Exchange (FACE) Council of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Our proposed research hypothesis holds that the re-creation of theatre spaces (through digital tools, amongst others), can help us better understand the ways in which cities have historically envisioned sites of spectacle as an index of cultural value. Virtuality plays an important role in this investigation, evidenced as much in our interest in unbuilt projects that remained in paper form, as in our recourse to VR to create immersive sensory models of these spaces. This project seeks to highlight several kinds of virtuality – theatrical, historical, technological – which are inherent in our understanding of the past, just as they are essential drivers of progress in contemporary humanities research.

 

The project Virtual Theatres in the French Atlantic World (and the present conference) build on numerous international collaborations which have surveyed forgotten theatres (e.g., the Agence Nationale de Recherche [ANR] project THEREPSICORE[1]), proposed restitutions of lost theatres (Lost Theatre Project[2], Visualising Lost Theatres Project[3]), recovering the sounds of the past (ANR project ECHO[4]), attempts to rediscover utopian theatrical projects (the museum exhibit Théâtres en utopie[5]), to digitally model the space and sociability of an eighteenth-century Paris Fair theatre (the NEH-funded VESPACE project[6]), or to interrogate how virtual tools can foster the rediscovery of structures that were never built, on the margins of early modern theatre institutions (the LAB 18-21[7], RECREATIS[8]). This recent work in theatre history (of which the preceding provides an indicative, but not exhaustive, list) proposes novel solutions to the difficult questions posed by the study of early modern sites of spectacle: what role for the virtual in historical discourse? What are the most effective and ethical ways to to give a perceptible form to virtual objects? What are the epistemological implications of the digitization of existing structures or practices? How can the audible dimension be best integrated into considerations of space? This gathering aims to provide an overview of current trends and promising new directions in performing arts historiography as well as emerging trends in transmission and teaching (such as the ARCHAS project at the Université de Lausanne, Switzerland[9]).

 

The international conference Rethinking Early Modern Sites of Spectacle welcomes proposals for presentations from researchers across humanities and technical disciplines (history, literature, theatre and performance studies, architecture, computer science, scenic art and technology, geography). We welcome a variety of presentation formats, from the “classic” 25-minute conference presentation (case studies, past or current projects, disciplinary theorizations), to collective communications or participatory experiences (roundtables, workshops, interactive formats).

 

Some possible topics include (but are not limited to):

 

The question of sources

·How to exploit sources (plans, documents, archives) which remain in the state of “paper projects” – unfinished, impossible, or utopian spaces of spectacle?

·Spatial imaginaries and perceptions of spaces by contemporaries. How does literature (plays, narrative fictions, eyewitness accounts) serve as a source for the study, restitution, and understanding of sites of spectacle in their social, sonic, and spatial dimensions?

·What sources must be taken into account for VR restitution? What is the role of speculation or imagination? What methodological precautions are required for virtual models, and what specific advantages do they afford researchers?

 

Tools, methods, theory

·What digital methods and techniques best serve the restitution of historical sites (“retroarchitecture”[10], 3D modeling and printing, sonic restitution, video game technologies…)?

·Implications of historical-site restitution in VR: questions of presence, embodiment, and publics.

·What role can the counterfactual play in performance historiography?

·Methods and implications of virtuality as an investigative tool for retrospective and prospective modeling.

·Place of cartographic tools (including GIS) in the understanding of sites of spectacle and their mutations over time.

·Implications and practices of interdisciplinary collaboration between the humanities and computer science.

 

The languages of the conference are French and English. We are open to proposals that lie outside of the early modern period (ca. 1500-1800) to the extent that they allow for a productive dialogue. Please send proposals of no more than 600 words, along with a title and a brief biblio-biographical statement by the deadline of 10 April 2022 to both pauline.beauce@u-bordeaux-montaigne.fr and jleichman@lsu.edu .

 

Indicative bibliography

Pauline Beaucé, Sandrine Dubouilh, Cyril Triolaire (eds.), Les Espaces du spectacle vivant dans la ville : permanence, mutation, hybridité (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles), PUBP, 2021.

Pannill Camp, The First Frame : Theatre Space in Enlightenment France, Cambridge University Press, 2014.

Marvin Carlson, Places of Performance : The Semiotics of Theatre Architecture, Cornell UP, 1993.

Jan Clarke, “Un théâtre qui n’a jamais existé : le tripot dans la rue du Temple”, Les Lieux  du spectacle dans l’Europe du XVIIIe siècle, Charles Mazouer (ed.), Tübingen, Gunter Narr Verlag, 2006, p. 103-117.

Quentin Deluermoz et Pierre Singaravélou, Pour une histoire des possibles. Analyses contrefactuelles et futurs non advenus, Points Essais, 2019.

Paul François, Florent Laroche, Françoise Rubellin, Jeffrey Leichman, “A methodology for reverse architecture: modelling space and use”, Procedia CIRP, ELSEVIER, 2019.

Paul François, Jeffrey Leichman, Florent Laroche, Françoise Rubellin, « Virtual reality as a versatile tool for research, dissemination and mediation in the humanities », Virtual Archaeology Review, 12.25 (2021), 1-15.

Jeffrey M. Leichman, “Video Games as Cultural History: Procedural Narrative and the Eighteenth-Century Fair Theatre”, Modes of Play in Eighteenth-Century France, eds. F. Falaky and R. McGinniss, Bucknell University Press, 2021.

Pierre Levy, Qu’est-ce que le virtuel ?, Paris, La Découverte, 1995.

Gay McAuley, Space in Performance : Making Meaning in the Theatre, U of Michigan P, 2000.

Yann Rocher, Théâtres en utopie, Arles, Actes Sud, 2014.

Joanne Tompkins, Theatre’s Heterotopias: Space and the Analysis of Performance.  Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

Joanne Tompkins, and Matthew Delbridge. “Using Virtual Reality Modelling In Cultural Management, Archiving And Research.” EVA London 2009: Electronic Visualisation and the Arts, Alan Seal, Suzanne Keene, Jonathan Bowen (eds.). London: British Computing Society. July 2009. 260-269.

Revue d’histoire urbaine, 2013/3, n° 38, Aller au théâtre

 

 

[1] Le théâtre sous la Révolution et l’Empire en province : salles et itinérance, construction des carrière, réception des répertoires, ANR project directed by Philippe Bourdin (Université Clermont Auvergne, UR CHEC). 

[2] Lost-theaters Project is a project initiated in 2011 under the direction of Hugh Denard (URL : https://www.lost-theatres.net/).

[3] Research consortium including Joanne Tompkins (University of Queensland, Australia) and. Julie Holledge (Flinders University, Australia). URL : https://ortelia.com/project/visualising-lost-theatres/).

[4] Écrire l’histoire de l’oral. L’émergence d’une oralité et d’une auralité modernes. Mouvements du phonique dans l’image scénique (1950-2000), ANR project directed by M.-M. Mervant-Roux (CNRS, UMR Thalim).

[5] Exhibit Théâtres en utopie – Un parcours d’architectures visionnaires, commissariat Yann Rocher, scénographie Xavier Dousson (2014). Exhibit catalogue published by Actes Sud in 2014.

[6] Interactive VR Simulation of an Eighteenth-Century Paris Fair Theatre: VESPACE (NEH award HAA-266501-19), PI Jeffrey M. Leichman.

[7] Théâtres et Lieux de Spectacles à Bordeaux : réalité et virtualité des espaces de loisirs urbains (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles), project supported by la Politique Scientifique de l’Université Bordeaux Montaigne (2018-2019), directed by Pauline Beaucé Sandrine Dubouilh.

[8] Recréer en réalité virtuelle : architecture et théâtres inaboutis, project supported by the MSH de Nantes under the direction of Laurent Lescop (ENSA Nantes) and Françoise Rubellin (Université de Nantes).

[9] Atelier de recherche créative en histoire des arts du spectacles, directed by Estelle Doudet, Université de Lausanne. URL: https://wp.unil.ch/archas/.

[10] Paul François, Outils de Réalité Virtuelle pour l’histoire et l’archéologie. Recherche, diffusion, médiation : le cas des théâtres de la Foire Saint-Germain, doctoral thesis, directed by Florent Laroche and Françoise Rubellin, Ecole Centrale, Université de Nantes, April 2021.

 

Appel à communication

 

Repenser les lieux de spectacle de la première modernité : 

sources et méthodes du virtuel pour l’histoire du théâtre

 

Université Bordeaux Montaigne, jeudi 8 et vendredi 9 décembre 2022 

 

Colloque international organisé dans le cadre du projet Virtual Theaters in the French Atlantic World : Spectacle and Urbanism (18th-19th centuries), financé par le Thomas Jefferson Fund de la French-American Cultural Exchange (FACE) Council du Ministère des Affaires Étrangères.

Organisateurs : Pauline Beaucé (Maîtresse de conférences en études théâtrales, Université Bordeaux Montaigne) et Jeffrey Leichman (Associate professor, French Literature, Louisiana State University), avec l’aide de Louise de Sédouy (doctorante, allocataire-monitrice, Université Bordeaux Montaigne).

Comité scientifique : 

Pannill Camp (Associate professor, Performing Arts, Washington University of St Louis) 

Jan Clarke (Professor of French, Durham University)

Sandrine Dubouilh (Professeure d’études théâtrales, Université Bordeaux Montaigne, Professeure à l’Ecole Nationale d’Architecture Paris Val de Seine) 

Paul François (Architecte, Ingénieur de recherche, CNRS A3M)

Jeffrey Ravel (Professor of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Françoise Rubellin (Professeure de littérature française XVIIIe siècle, Université de Nantes) 

Cyril Triolaire (Maître de conférences en études théâtrales, Université Clermont Auvergne)

 

Le colloque international Repenser les lieux du spectacle de la première modernité a pour objectif de dégager de nouvelles perspectives sur l’histoire du théâtre de la première modernité en s’intéressant aux recherches qui portent sur l’étude des lieux de spectacles, leurs usages, leur implantation dans les villes et dans l’imaginaire collectif. En effet, travailler sur ces espaces permet d’envisager les conditions matérielles et artistiques du spectacle mais aussi d’interroger les usages sociaux à l’œuvre. L’intérêt pour les lieux de théâtre anciens n’est pas nouveau mais à l’ère du numérique, il s’accompagne de nouvelles potentialités. Aux méthodes d’analyse et de restitutions traditionnelles s’ajoutent les outils offerts par la modélisation numérique. Ils rendent possible non seulement de visualiser, d’analyser les théâtres et l’activité qu’ils accueillent mais aussi de faire l’expérience sensible des lieux du passé.

Les problématiques principales de ce colloque s’orienteront ainsi vers la notion de virtuel en ce qu’elle permet d’interroger non seulement les outils technologiques à disposition du chercheur (réalité virtuelle, impression 3D, jeu vidéo, SIG…) mais aussi de repenser les sources parfois peu exploitées (les plans ou descriptions de lieux virtuels jamais construits) ou à réinvestir (imaginaire des espaces de spectacle dans la fiction, archives concernant les aspects matériels). In fine, ces outils et ces sources soulèvent des enjeux qui dépassent l’écriture de l’histoire du théâtre et interrogent aussi la médiation des savoirs (pédagogie, patrimonialisation, création artistique). Conséquemment, sur le plan institutionnel, l’exploitation de ces technologies implique également un décloisonnement des champs de recherche avec l’obligation de collaboration au sein des ​équipes qui rassemblent des compétences très diverses, mais dont les besoins sp​écifiques de chaque membre ne seront pas toujours alignés. Questionner et renouveler les modalités de la recherche en histoire du théâtre sera ainsi un des buts de ce colloque, qui cherche aussi à dégager des modèles possibles pour concevoir le travail de l’historien dans un paysage universitaire international en pleine mutation.

Ce colloque vient clore le projet transatlantique Virtual Theaters in the French Atlantic World : Spectacle and Urbanism (18th-19th centuries), financé par le Thomas Jefferson Fund de la French-American Cultural Exchange (FACE) Council du Ministère des Affaires Étrangères. L’hypothèse de recherche proposée soutient que la recréation des espaces théâtraux (entre autres, par le biais du numérique) peut nous aider à mieux comprendre la façon dont les villes ont historiquement envisagé les lieux de spectacle comme un indice de valeur culturelle. Cette virtualité se retrouve tout autant dans notre intérêt pour les lieux qui n’ont pas vu le jour et sont restés à l’état de projets papier que dans l’usage de la réalité virtuelle pour reconstituer de façon sensible ces espaces. Ce projet met en évidence de nombreux types de virtualité – théâtrale, historique et technologique – qui sont inhérents à notre compréhension du passé, tout comme ils sont essentiels au développement de la recherche en sciences humaines.

Le projet Virtual Theatres in the French Atlantic World et le colloque présent qui en est issu, s’inscrivent dans le sillage de plusieurs projets internationaux qui ont recensé des salles oubliées (par exemple l’ANR Therepsicore[1]), qui ont proposé de restituer les théâtres aujourd’hui disparus (Lost Theater Project[2] ; Visualising Lost Theaters Project[3]), de retrouver les sons du passé (ANR Echo[4]), d’œuvrer à une redécouverte des lieux utopiques dans l’histoire du théâtre (exposition Théâtres en utopie[5]), de recréer une soirée théâtrale dans un théâtre forain du XVIIIe siècle pour explorer les sociabilités à l’œuvre (VESPACE[6]) ou encore d’interroger la manière dont l’outil virtuel permet de mettre au jour des lieux qui n’ont jamais abouti, en marge des théâtres institutionnels (The LAB 18-2[7], RECREATIS[8]). Ces projets et travaux récents en histoire du théâtre, dont les exemples cités ne sauraient être exhaustifs, proposent des solutions inédites aux questions difficiles posées par l’étude des lieux de spectacle de la première modernité : quelle place donner au virtuel dans le discours historique ? Quels sont les meilleurs moyens de donner une forme perceptible aux objets virtuels ? Quelles sont les implications épistémologiques de l’informatisation des structures ou pratiques réelles ? Comment intégrer la dimension sonore inhérente à toute réflexion sur l’espace ? Cette rencontre permettra ainsi de saisir les tendances actuelles et les nouvelles orientations prometteuses qui traversent l’historiographie des spectacles et engagent aussi le renouvellement et la transmission des savoirs (comme le projet ARCHAS à l’Université de Lausanne[9]).

Ce colloque international sollicite des propositions de communication venant de chercheurs et chercheuses appartenant à des disciplines variées (histoire, littérature, architecture, archéologie, sciences du numérique, arts de la scène, géographie). Nous encourageons des formats variés, allant de l’intervention classique (communication de 25 minutes sur des études de cas, des projets passés ou à venir, ou des théorisations disciplinaires), à la communication collective ou à l’expérience participative (ateliers, dispositifs interactifs). 

 

Les pistes évoquées ci-dessous ne sont pas exhaustives : 

 

La question des sources

*Comment exploiter les sources (plans, documents archives…) qui restent des projets papiers, des lieux inaboutis, irréalisables voire utopiques ? 

* Imaginaire des lieux et perception des espaces par les contemporains. Comment la littérature (pièces de théâtre, fictions, témoignages…) peut-elle servir de source à l’étude, la restitution et la compréhension des lieux de spectacle dans leur dimension sociale, sonore et spatiale ?

*Quelles sont les sources à prendre en compte dans le cas d’une restitution en réalité virtuelle ? Quelle est la part d’imaginaire ? Quelles sont les précautions méthodologiques requises pour développer les modèles virtuels et quels sont les bénéfices possibles d’une telle technologie pour la recherche ? 

 

 

Outils, méthodes, théorie 

*Quelles méthodes et techniques numériques pour restituer les lieux du passé (« rétroarchitecture »[10], modélisation et impression 3D, restitution sonore, jeu vidéo…) ? 

* Enjeux de la restitution des lieux du passé en réalité virtuelle : question de la présence ? de l’embodiment (incarnation d’un avatar) ? Quels publics ?

* Quelle place pour la dimension contrefactuelle dans l’écriture de l’histoire des spectacles ?

* Méthodes et enjeux de la virtualité comme outil d’investigation rétrospective et prospective.

* Place des outils de cartographie dans l’appréhension des lieux de spectacle et de leurs mutations dans le temps (Système d’Information Géographique).

* Enjeux et pratiques de la collaboration interdisciplinaire (SHS-sciences numériques).

 

 

 

Les langues du colloque sont le français et l’anglais. Nous n’exclurons pas forcément les propositions qui sortent du cadre de la première modernité (ca 1500-1800) si elles permettent d’engager un dialogue fécond. Les propositions de communication de 600 mots maximum, assorties d’un titre et d’une brève biobibliographie sont à envoyer pour le 10 avril 2022 au plus tard à pauline.beauce@u-bordeaux-montaigne.fr et jleichman@lsu.edu

 

Bibliographie indicative

Pauline Beaucé, Sandrine Dubouilh, Cyril Triolaire (dir.), Les Espaces du spectacle vivant dans la ville : permanence, mutation, hybridité (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles), PUBP, 2021.

Pannill Camp, The First Frame : Theatre Space in Enlightenment France, Cambridge University Press, 2014.

Marvin Carlson, Places of Performance : The Semiotics of Theatre Architecture, Cornell UP, 1993.

Jan Clarke, « Un théâtre qui n’a jamais existé : le tripot dans la rue du Temple », Les Lieux  du spectacle dans l’Europe du XVIIIesiècle, Charles Mazouer (dir.), Tübingen, Gunter Narr Verlag, 2006, p. 103-117.

Quentin Deluermoz et Pierre Singaravélou, Pour une histoire des possibles. Analyses contrefactuelles et futurs non advenus, Paris, Points Essais, 2019.

Paul François, Florent Laroche, Françoise Rubellin, Jeffrey Leichman, « A methodology for reverse architecture: modelling space and use », Procedia CIRP, ELSEVIER, 2019.

Paul François, Jeffrey Leichman, Florent Laroche, Françoise Rubellin, « Virtual reality as a versatile tool for research, dissemination and mediation in the humanities », Virtual Archaeology Review, Spanish Society of Virtual Archaeology, In press.

Jeffrey M. Leichman, « Video Games as Cultural History: Procedural Narrative and the Eighteenth-Century Fair Theatre », Modes of Play in Eighteenth-Century France, eds. F. Falaky and R. McGinniss. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2021.

Pierre Levy, Qu’est-ce que le virtuel ?, Paris, La Découverte, 1995.

Gay McAuley, Space in Performance : Making Meaning in the Theatre, U of Michigan Press, 2000.

Yann Rocher, Théâtres en utopie, Arles, Actes Sud, 2014.

Joanne Tompkins, Theatre’s Heterotopias: Space and the Analysis of Performance.  Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

Joanne Tompkins, and Matthew Delbridge. « Using Virtual Reality Modelling In Cultural Management, Archiving And Research.» EVA London 2009: Electronic Visualisation and the Arts. [refereed] Conference Proceedings. Ed. Alan Seal, Suzanne Keene, Jonathan Bowen. London: British Computing Society. July 2009. 260-269.

Revue d’histoire urbaine, 2013/3, n° 38, Aller au théâtre

 

[1] Le théâtre sous la Révolution et l’Empire en province : salles et itinérance, construction des carrière, réception des répertoires, projet ANR coordonné par Pr. Philippe Bourdin (Université Clermont Auvergne, UR CHEC). 

[2] Lost-theaters Project est un projet initié en 2011 et porté par Dr. Hugh Denard (URL : https://www.lost-theatres.net/).

[3] Consortium auquel appartient Pr. Joanne Tompkins (University of Queensland, Australia), Pr. Julie Holledge notamment (Flinders University, Australia). URL : https://ortelia.com/project/visualising-lost-theatres/).

[4] Écrire l’histoire de l’oral. L’émergence d’une oralité et d’une auralité modernes. Mouvements du phonique dans l’image scénique (1950-2000), projet ANR coordonné par Dr. M.-M. Mervant-Roux (CNRS, UMR Thalim).

[5] Exposition Théâtres en utopie – Un parcours d’architectures visionnaires, commissariat Yann Rocher, scénographie Xavier Dousson (2014). Catalogue de l’exposition paru chez Actes Sud en 2014.

[6] Interactive VR Simulation of an Eighteenth-Century Paris Fair Theatre: VESPACE (NEH award HAA-266501-19), PI Dr. Jeffrey M. Leichman.

[7] Théâtres et Lieux de Spectacles à Bordeaux : réalité et virtualité des espaces de loisirs urbains (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles), projet soutenu par la Politique Scientifique de l’Université Bordeaux Montaigne (2018-2019), mené par Dr. Pauline Beaucé et Pr. Sandrine Dubouilh.

[8] Recréer en réalité virtuelle : architecture et théâtres inaboutis, projet soutenu par la MSH de Nantes et coordonné par Pr. Laurent Lescop (ENSA Nantes) et Pr. Françoise Rubellin (Université de Nantes).

[9] Atelier de recherche créative en histoire des arts du spectacles, Pr. Estelle Doudet, Université de Lausanne. URL: https://wp.unil.ch/archas/.

[10] Paul François, Outils de Réalité Virtuelle pour l’histoire et l’archéologie. Recherche, diffusion, médiation : le cas des théâtres de la Foire Saint-Germain, thèse de doctorat, sous la direction de Florent Laroche et Françoise Rubellin, Ecole Centrale, Université de Nantes, avril 2021.

Contact Email: