Human Trafficking in Africa: New Perspectives, New Paradigms

Alecia D. Hoffman's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
May 31, 2020 to July 15, 2020
Location: 
United States
Subject Fields: 
Human Rights, Immigration & Migration History / Studies, Political Science, Public Policy, Slavery

 

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Human Trafficking in Africa: New Perspectives, New Paradigms

Editors: Alecia D. Hoffman and Sabella O. Abidde

 

According to the United States Department of State 2019 Trafficking in Persons Report, there are approximately 28,156 victims of trafficking on the African continent in 2018. As startling as this figure may be, it could be a “conservative estimate” this according to the Global Slavery Index, which reports much higher numbers.  Human Trafficking, along with terrorism, drug trafficking, social and economic inequality, political violence, and racial inequality are some of the vexing social issues of our time. Nevertheless, trafficking in humans is not just a disconcerting social issue, it impacts other areas of our individual and collective lives. And while there is the tendency to think of it as a phenomenon with origins in recent decades; available evidence suggests that trafficking in humans has been around for much of human history.

 

The trading of Africans, both continentally and globally, began at the end of the 7th century with the rise of Islam, and in the 15th century with the Atlantic slave trade. The United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) defines human trafficking as “the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring, or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of giving or receiving payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.” This definition is so expansive it includes illicit transactions such as labor and commercial sexual exploitation, forced labor and child soldiers, forced marriage, domestic servitude, and the removal of organs or tissues for sale.

 

While many countries are lagging, an increasing number seeks to end this perverse and inhumane practices through various forms of legislation and protocols. For instance, in November 2006, the African Union adopted the AU.COMMIT campaign or the Ouagadougou Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings. Although a commitment has been made by member states of the continental governing body, the implementation and follow-through are hindered by a lack of proper law enforcement training, poor interregional cooperation, and cultural differences.

 

Although most of the literature on this issue highlights human trafficking from a global or regional perspective, this volume seeks to highlight the entire African continent. Central to this volume are five key issues: (1) the theoretical paradigms that explain human trafficking on the continent;  (2) the legal framework and protocols currently in place and whether they have been effective; (3) the applicable domestic legislation and how effective they are in combating this human scourge; (4) the economic and human cost of human trafficking on the victims and the larger society; and (5) the cultural and social factors that give impetus to certain forms of human trafficking. Furthermore, there is a need to examine the effectiveness of governments and institutions vis-à-vis human trafficking. To this end, we invite scholars to submit abstracts that address the above-listed and suggested topics:

 

  1. An Overview of Relevant Theories to Examine Human Trafficking
  2. The Palermo Protocol and its Effectiveness
  3. Connecting the Links between Migration and Human Trafficking
  4. The Consequences of Trafficking on Female Victims in Africa
  5. The Forced Harragas: Socio-Political Analysis of Modern-Day Slavery in North Africa
  6. An Analysis of Established Routes of Movement of Persons through the Sahel Region
  7. An Examination of Modern-Day Slavery and Bondage in Libya
  8. Bring Back Our Girls: An Examination of Boko Haram and the Kidnapped Girls
  9. The Trafficking of Women and Girls in Northern Nigeria, Cameroon, and Chad
  10. Human Trafficking in the East African Community (EAC)
  11. Human Trafficking in the Southern African Development Community (SADAC)
  12. A Legal Response to Human Trafficking in Africa
  13. Human Trafficking in Madagascar, Cape Verde, Comoros, Mauritius, and Seychelles
  14. The AU and NGOs: Policy Frameworks and the Mitigation of Trafficking Networks
  15. Child Soldiering in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and the DRC
  16. Arranged and Forced Marriages
  17. The Human Suffering Associated with Human Trafficking
  18. Prostitution and Peacekeeping Forces

 

NOTE:

  • Please check with the editors to see if (a) any of the listed topics are still available; or (b) you are interested in a topic that is not listed but which may fit into the overall theme of this project.

 

FORMATTING/CITATION /DUE DATES:

  • Please submit a 300-350-word abstract plus a 150-250-word biography along with your official contact information by 15 July 2020
  • You will be notified of acceptance or rejection of abstract by 15 August 2020
  • The completed chapter: 7500-8500 words (including notes and references) is due 30 November  2020
  • For formatting and citation, please adopt the Chicago Manual of Style 16th edition.
  • Please send your abstract, brief biography, contact information, and inquiry about topics to aleciahoffman312@gmail.com and please cc the co-editor at Sabidde@gmail.com

 

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Alecia D. Hoffman is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Alabama State University. She holds a BA from Alabama State University (1996), an MA from Auburn University (1998), and a Ph.D. from Clark Atlanta University (2015). Her areas of interest include South-South cooperation and development, international relations, international political economy, foreign policy, and Sino-African relations. Dr. Hoffman serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Africana Studies.  Dr. Hoffman is the author, co-author, editor, and co-editor of several publications. She is a member of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS), the Chinese in Africa/Africans in China Research Initiative, and the Southern Political Science Association (SPSA).

Sabella O. Abidde is a Professor of Political Science and a member of the Graduate Faculty at Alabama State University. He earned his Ph.D. (2009) in African Studies, World Affairs, Public Policy and Development Studies from Howard University, and an MA in political science from Minnesota State University. Dr. Abidde is the editor of Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean: The Case for Bilateral and Multilateral Cooperation (Lexington Books, 2018); and co-editor of Africans and the Exiled Life: Migration, Culture, and Globalization (Lexington Books, 2017). An upcoming book on “Migrants, Refugees, and the Internally Displaced” is due in fall 2020. Dr. Abidde is a member of the Association of Global South Studies (AGSS); the African Studies and Research Forum (ASRF); the Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa (ASMEA); and the American Political Science Association (APSA).


 

 

Contact Info: 

Alecia D. Hoffman is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Alabama State University. She holds a BA from Alabama State University (1996), an MA from Auburn University (1998), and a Ph.D. from Clark Atlanta University (2015). Her areas of interest include South-South cooperation and development, international relations, international political economy, foreign policy, and Sino-African relations. Dr. Hoffman serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Africana Studies.  Dr. Hoffman is the author, co-author, editor, and co-editor of several publications. She is a member of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS), the Chinese in Africa/Africans in China Research Initiative, and the Southern Political Science Association (SPSA).

Sabella O. Abidde is a Professor of Political Science and a member of the Graduate Faculty at Alabama State University. He earned his Ph.D. (2009) in African Studies, World Affairs, Public Policy and Development Studies from Howard University, and an MA in political science from Minnesota State University. Dr. Abidde is the editor of Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean: The Case for Bilateral and Multilateral Cooperation (Lexington Books, 2018); and co-editor of Africans and the Exiled Life: Migration, Culture, and Globalization (Lexington Books, 2017). An upcoming book on “Migrants, Refugees, and the Internally Displaced” is due in fall 2020. Dr. Abidde is a member of the Association of Global South Studies (AGSS); the African Studies and Research Forum (ASRF); the Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa (ASMEA); and the American Political Science Association (APSA).