FOOD, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE IN AFRICA

MUTIAT OLADEJO's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
October 31, 2019 to February 28, 2020
Location: 
Nigeria
Subject Fields: 
African History / Studies, Anthropology, Environmental History / Studies, Historic Preservation, Indigenous Studies

DEVELOPMENT DISCOURSE IN AFRICA RESEARCH FORUM

c/o Obinrin Afrika Initiative for Research and Development

E-mail: obiradeducation@gmail.com

                                          Phone: +234-8033872796, +234-8035931820

P.O. BOX 23182, U.I. Post Office, Ibadan, Nigeria.

 

CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTERS

FOOD, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE IN AFRICA

Concept

Food is an indispensable theme in African culture and civilization. The transition and transformation of food feature variants of factors that define the notions of being and living in Africa. Scholars in the humanities and sciences articulate markers of disciplinary analysis of food.  Beyond this, the thematic relevance of food to human existence is entrenched in the socio-political and economic structures of the society. Mostly, anthropologists and historians (McCann, 2009; Shaw et al, 1993) analyses the place of food in Africa, regarding its evolution and origins.  Understanding food is complex because its historical trajectories nuance various diversities of African societies shaped by experiences of capitalism, colonialism, imperialism and modernization. Globalisation and technology from the twentieth century account for the notions of modernity, which is webbed in changes and continuities. In contemporary times, African food systems are also globalized as transnational and diaspora influences matter in the trends of technology and advancement. Food technologists have established breakthroughs to upgrade African food discoveries and culture, while agricultural and food research programmes have produced knowledge. However, there are discordant perceptions about food and technologies with subjectivities entangled in the context of tradition and modernity. Ultimately, the discoveries of food and technological advancement maps Africa in the geopolitics and science of human development that is evolving.

Contributions are expected, but not limited to the following themes:

 

  • Epistemological and Theoretical considerations in African food systems
  • Food origins, history and scientific evolutions
  • Political economy of food
  • Food tourism, festivals and exhibitions
  • Food discoveries and inventions
  • Food and agricultural technologies
  • Food culture and religious beliefs
  • Food discoveries and culture
  • Delicacies and cookbooks
  • Media and food discoveries
  • Food technology and popular culture
  • Food, crisis and security
  • Gender and food technology
  • Food safety, health and nutrition
  • Culinary practices and technology
  • Food entrepreneurship and retailing
  • Food and urban spaces
  • Food research and knowledge hubs
  • Food culture and sustainability
  • Food and transnational influences
  • Food and African Development
  • Technology application to African Culture

The proposed book will be edited by:

  • Clement Adesoji Ogunlade Ph.D

Department of Agricultural Engineering, Adeleke University, Nigeria.

  • Kehinde M. Adeleke,

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Adeleke University, Nigeria.

and

  • Mutiat Titilope Oladejo Ph.D

Department of History, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

A maximum of 20 pages is expected for each chapter. Contributors have 3-months to submit the first draft of their chapter. All manuscripts will be subjected to peer-review. Manuscript should be submitted to obiradeducation@gmail.com

 

  • January 10, 2020 –      Submission of full chapter
  • February 15, 2020 –    Peer-Review Decision/ Manuscript Returned for Revision
  • March 15, 2020 –        Submission of Final Draft

 

 

Contact Info: 
  • Clement Adesoji Ogunlade Ph.D

Department of Agricultural Engineering, Adeleke University, Nigeria.

clement2k5@yahoo.com

 

  • Kehinde M. Adeleke,

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Adeleke University, Nigeria.

and

  • Mutiat Titilope Oladejo Ph.D

Department of History, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.