Temple ICAS Events in October

Robert  Dujarric's picture
Type: 
Lecture
Date: 
October 8, 2019
Location: 
Japan
Subject Fields: 
Asian History / Studies, Chinese History / Studies, Japanese History / Studies, Russian or Soviet History / Studies, Environmental History / Studies

Greetings: 

We are pleased to share upcoming ICAS lectures at Temple University, Japan Campus in Tokyo. ICAS evening lectures are free and open to the public, and held in English unless otherwise specified. Please feel free to share, and join us with guests and friends. For those not familiar with ICAS, we invite you to visit the ICAS page on the TUJ website: http://www.tuj.ac.jp/icas

“I survived the climate crisis so far, but what’s next?”

Date: Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)
Venue: Temple University, Japan Campus, 1F Parliament
            1-14-29 Taishido, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (see access map here.) 
Speaker: Marinel Sumook Ubaldo Climate change activist and speaker at the 2015 COP21 Conference in Paris 
Moderator: Bjoern Schimkat, Campaigns Coordinator, Amnesty International Japan 
RSVP: icas@tuj.temple.edu
* RSVP is encouraged, but not required.  

Overview:

In November 2013, Marinel Ubaldo had just turned 16 years old when Typhoon Yolanda swept away her village in the Philippines. It killed more than 6,000 people; injured at least 28,000, and destroyed the homes and livelihoods many, as it affected 16 million people.

Marinel and her family survived, huddled together for days with no food or drinking water; waiting for help from the outside world. This is when Marinel realized that it was the same outside world—and global heating—that was the cause of their misery.

At that moment, miserable, thirsty and hungry, she decided to become an activist. To campaign in defense of her people, all people. To demand that the corporations and governments responsible for their misery take responsibility, and develop an action plan to save us from disaster. Join us to hear Marinel describe how she became an activist, and discuss how to support her and be more effective activists ourselves.

This event is co-organized with Amnesty International Japan.

Speaker:
Marinel Sumook Ubaldo is a young activist working to raise awareness of global heating. She spoke at the COP21 in Paris (the 2015 UN’s Climate Change Conference) and testified at an investigation in New York about corporate responsibility for climate change and human rights abuses. She conducts seminars for communities and students on environmental issues, climate change and climate justice. Marinel also helped organizing the global climate strike on 20 September 2019.

Japan and Russia: Contemporary Political, Economic, and Military Relations

Date: Thursday, October 17, 2019
Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)
Venue: Temple University, Japan Campus, 1F Parliament
            1-14-29 Taishido, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (see access map here.) 
Panelists: 
Elena Shadrina,  Associate Professor, Waseda University
Yu Koizumi, Project Assistant Professor, University of Tokyo
James D. J. Brown, Associate Professor of Political Science at Temple University, Japan Campus
Moderator: Robert Dujarric, ICAS Director
RSVP: icas@tuj.temple.edu
* RSVP is encouraged, but not required.  

Overview:

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has made relations with Russia a leading priority of his foreign policy. He has met with Russian president Vladimir Putin on a total of 27 occasions, including most recently at the Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok in September 2019. These efforts have yet to break the deadlock in the countries’ long-standing dispute over the Russian-held Southern Kuril Islands (Northern Territories in Japan) and a peace treaty remains a distant prospect. Nonetheless, the territorial dispute remains just one aspect of this bilateral relationship.

Our panel seeks to look beyond the narrow territorial issue to evaluate the broader status of Japan-Russia relations in the areas of politics, economics, and the military.

Panelists:
Elena Shadrina, Associate Professor, Waseda University
Elena Shadrina holds a PhD in Economics. She is an associate professor at the School of International Liberal Studies at Waseda University (Tokyo), where she is lecturing on Comparative Economic Systems and Russian Economic Studies. Her most recent research interests include energy governance with application of theoretical frameworks of New Institutional Economics and New Comparative Economics, energy policy and political economy of renewable and conventional energy in Russia and Central Asia, and comparative energy integration in the Eurasian Economic Union and European Union. Some of Dr. Shadrina’s most recent publications include contributions to co-authored volumes: “Energy Integration in the Eurasian Economic Union: A Preliminary Study on Progress and Policy Implications” in Economies, Politics and Societies in the Post-Communist Countries: Thirty Years since the Fall of the Berlin Wall (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming) and “Renewable Energy in Central Asian Economies: Role in Reducing Regional Energy Insecurity” in Energy Insecurity in Asia: Challenges, Solutions, and Renewable Energy (ADBI Press, 2019).

Yu Koizumi, Project Assistant Professor, University of Tokyo
Yu Koizumi is a project assistant professor at the University of Tokyo. He holds a masters degree from Waseda University. His main research area is Russian security policy, including military strategy, reform of the armed forces, nuclear strategy, strategies in new domains (cyber, information, etc). His latest book Geopolitics of Russia as ‘Empire’ (Tokyodo Shuppan, 2019, in Japanese) explores the source of Russia’s recent coercive behaviors in post-Soviet countries by analyzing various discourses about Russia’s self-image. He is a regular contributor to the journal Military Review and actively comments on TV and radio programs.

James D. J. Brown, Associate Professor of Political Science at Temple University, Japan Campus
James D.J. Brown is an associate professor of Political Science at Temple University, Japan Campus. He holds an undergraduate degree from the University of York, and postgraduate degrees from the universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Aberdeen. His main area of research is Japan’s foreign policy and especially Japan-Russia relations. Dr Brown’s work has been published in several academic journals, including International Affairs, Asia Policy, International Politics, Post-Soviet Affairs, Europe-Asia Studies, Problems of Post-Communism, The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus, and Politics. His two most recent books are Japan, Russia and their Territorial Dispute: The Northern Delusion (Routledge 2017) and Japan’s Foreign Relations in Asia, edited with Jeff Kingston (Routledge 2018). He also regularly writes op-eds, including for The Nikkei Asian Review, The Japan Times, and The Diplomat.

China’s New Navy and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

Date: Thursday, October 24, 2019
Time: 7:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)
Venue: Temple University, Japan Campus, 1F Parliament
            1-14-29 Taishido, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (see access map here.) 
Speaker: 
Richard Salmons, Adjunct Professor at Temple University, Japan Campus
Moderator: Robert Dujarric, ICAS Director
RSVP: icas@tuj.temple.edu
* RSVP is encouraged, but not required.  

Overview:

One of the most important roles of China's growing navy may not be to fight the United States Navy, but instead to replace it as a provider of peacetime security in the Asia-Pacific region. Strategists have become well aware of the importance of navies delivering international public goods such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. By letting rivals simultaneously demonstrate material power, establish practical international ties, and build legitimacy, disaster relief has become a way for states to compete for status relative to each other. Indeed, as the Asia-Pacific international hierarchy is increasingly in flux, international disaster relief has become a useful illustration of regional order building in action. 

We saw a demonstration of this after Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines in 2013, when both the US and Japan enjoyed soft power benefits from their high-profile aid, while China was embarrassed by its small contribution. Yet in just the past five years, China has constructed a large amphibious fleet, which could play significant peacetime roles in natural disasters and citizen evacuation. 

What will be the effect on the regional order if we begin to see Chinese naval task forces arriving to assist in future peacetime crises?

Speaker:
Richard Salmons has worked as a journalist and as a diplomat with the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, where he was posted to the Australian Embassy in Jakarta, and as a policy adviser in the Australian Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. After receiving an Australian government scholarship, he completed a Ph.D. in the Coral Bell School of Asia-Pacific Affairs at the Australian National University. His dissertation investigated the post-Cold War international relations of Japan, China and India, and focused on how concerns about national status can drive states towards riskier or more assertive policy options. Since receiving his doctorate, Richard has been teaching political science at Temple University, Japan Campus.

 

Contact Info: 

Robert Dujarric
Director, Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies
Temple University Japan Campus

Contact Email: