African Arts, Culture, Entertainment and Tourism in the Age of Globalization and Uncertainty

Ismail Alimi's picture
Type: 
Workshop
Date: 
September 25, 2019
Location: 
Nigeria
Subject Fields: 
African History / Studies, Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Cultural History / Studies, Journalism and Media Studies, Languages

Whether tangible or intangible, arts, language and culture are paradigmatic features of group identities and social definitions. These have been manipulated in the past by individuals and groups as tools for political advantage. They have also been called upon in peculiar exigencies to construct, define or validate identity claims. Through tourism and entertainment, art and culture have also played vital roles of improving revenue and achieving intra and internal cohesion for states and local communities. With rapid globalization of media, discourses on art, language and cultural identities have generated different feelings and fears. While some scholars emphasize that cultural globalization is a new phase of cultural imperialism, contending that it could ultimately lead to hybridity of cultural identities, others emphasize that culture is dynamic and capable of contracting and expanding. It is within this contradiction that the future of African arts, language and culture is being appraised, and the flexibility and fluidity of African/Yoruba arts, language and culture in the postmodern period being interrogated for clearer understanding.

 

This workshop seeks to understand how global media impact on African/Yoruba arts, language culture and identity. Among other questions posed are; to what extent has the global media changed discourses and impacted on national arts, language, culture and identity of the Yoruba people? How much has the Yoruba changed culturally, lost or gained in the postmodern period? How can a society learn and gain culturally without losing its cultural originality? What are modern ways of promoting and preserving culture? What is the future of African arts, language and culture?  Using the Yoruba context as an example, how is cultural globalization different from cultural imperialism? We are also interested in studies on how African culture, arts, tourism and entertainment shape global media, and how global media impact on African art, language and culture.

 

Interested participants can explore one of the following or related themes:

 

African/Yoruba art, language, culture and global media;

Conceptualising cultural synchronization and cultural imperialism;

African/Yoruba culture as tourism;

African/Yoruba Arts and Artists;

Arts, Culture, Festival, Tourism and African Image;

Globalisation, global media, African./Yoruba Religions and Deities;

Insecurity and Tourism in Africa;

Historical Sites and Preservation of Artefacts in Africa/Yorubaland;

Tourism and African Festivals;

Archaeological Survey of African Arts and Culture  

Olojo Festival in Ile-Ife/ Yoruba History;

Globalization, African Art and Culture;

Globalization and African Entertainment Industry;

Tourism and Economic Development of Africa;

Government Policies and Future of Tourism in Africa;

African Museums;

Globalisation and African/Yoruba Technologies;

Methodological Approaches to Study African Arts, Culture, Language, Entertainment and Tourism;

African Music;

Globalization, Global Media and Nollywood in Africa.

 

This workshop is organized by Ile Oduduwa in collaboration with the Institute of Cultural Studies, Obafemi Awolowo University, as part of the Olojo festival. The significance of festivals in African culture cannot be overemphasized. Among the Yoruba people, festival is often seen as an avenue to show gratitude, lay petitions and present their requests before their deities/ancestors. The place of Ife as the cradle and spiritual home of the Yoruba is an established fact, while the Ooni is a sacred king, custodian of the Yoruba cultural heritage and head of all Yoruba kings. A distinctive festival among the Ife people of Southwestern Nigeria is the Olojo festival. This festival is held annually between the month of September and October. A colloquium on the workshop theme shall be held at the Palace of Ooni of Ife on 25th September, 2019.

 

Practical Information

Deadline for submitting abstract: September 25th, 2019;

Workshop Date: 12th November.

Submission of full paper January 8, 2020.

 

Registration is free. Lunch will be provided for all participants. Limited funding is available to cover accommodation and travel cost. This will be awarded based on merit to few qualified applicants with particular preference for the postgraduate students. This is subject to review. Selected articles will be peer reviewed and published in an edited volume.

Please send an abstract of 150 words with six key words to oduduwaogun@gmail.com . Include your full names, institutional affiliation and email address.

The workshop will take place at Obafemi Awolowo University in November 12, 2019.

 

The Colloquium is organized in honor of Ooni of Ife, Oba Enitan Adeyeye Ogunwusi, Ojaja II.

 

For more information please contact members of the LOC:

Dr. Félix Ayoh’OMIDIRE (Director, Institute of Cultural Studies, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife- 08067634158);

Dr Shina Alimi (Department of History, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife – 08038019073);

Mr Akin Adejuwon (Curator, Martin Aworinlewo Museum of Antiquities and Contemporary African Art, Institute of Cultural Studies, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife-08039445330).

 

Contact Info: 

Dr. Félix Ayoh’OMIDIRE (Director, Institute of Cultural Studies, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife- 08067634158);

Dr Shina Alimi (Department of History, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife – 08038019073);

Mr Akin Adejuwon (Curator, Martin Aworinlewo Museum of Antiquities and Contemporary African Art, Institute of Cultural Studies, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife-08039445330).

 

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