CfP EAAA 2020: Tantric, Folk, and Tribal Goddesses in the Art of South Asia: Intersection, Transformation, and Fusion of Mainstream and ‘Marginal’ Traditions

Paolo E. Rosati's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
August 15, 2019
Subject Fields: 
Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Indigenous Studies, Religious Studies and Theology, South Asian History / Studies, Women's & Gender History / Studies
Call for Papers
for the 3rd conference of the European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology (EAAA)
University of Ljubljana (Slovenia), 16-20 September 2020

 

TANTRIC, FOLK, AND TRIBAL GODDESSES IN THE ART OF SOUTH ASIA

INTERSECTION, TRANSFORMATION, AND FUSION OF MAINSTREAM AND 'MARGINAL' TRADITIONS

The South Asian Goddess emerges as a multifarious deity, who intersected, transformed, and fused many contrasting traits and symbols. The origin of her ambivalence is traced back not only to the process of Sanskritization or Hinduization, but also to the processes of tribalization, parochialization, folklorization, and mutual cross-pollination.

The Goddess’s aspect as a terrifying mother is indeed closely related to liminal, and dangerous elements—such as blood sacrifices (balidāna), sexual rites (yonipūjā, rajapāna, etc.), shamanic and magic practices, possession-dance, cremation grounds, ghosts, spirits and corpse, wild and nocturnal animals, flying beings, non-anthropomorphic and natural elements (e.g. stones, trees, caves, mountains). Thereof, most of her liminal symbolism was dismissed by Brahmanism as non-orthodox one.

Hence, this panel firstly addresses the Tantric, folk, and tribal Goddess’s iconography as a frightening mother. Then, correlating art history with other disciplines—such as, but not limited to, anthropology, archaeology, ethnography, religious studies, textual studies—this panel aims to explore the intersection, transformation, and fusion of mainstream and heterodox traits of the Goddess at the ‘margins’ of South Asia, in order to shed light on her heterogeneous substratum.

 

Successful papers are expected to explore one or more of the following topics in South Asian art:

  • Folk, and Tribal Goddesses
  • Magic and Shamanism in the Goddess’s cult
  • Tantric kingship and the Goddess
  • Sex, and Violence in the Goddess’s cult
  • Skulls, Cemeteries, and the Goddess
  • Non-anthropomorphic image of the Goddess
  • The bestiary of the Goddess
  • Gender confusion in the Goddess’s images
  • Water and/or Earth in the Goddess’s symbolism

 

A selection of papers is planned to be published in a volume.

 

Please email your name, title, abstract (max 250 words), and your short CV (max 1 page) to paoloe.rosati@gmail.com by 15th August 2019 (possibly before 4:00 p.m.)

Contact Info: 
Paolo E. Rosati, PhD in Asian and Africa Studies ('Sapienza' University of Rome)
Contact Email: