Daniel P. Aldrich, UTokyo lecture July 24 on Black Wave: How Networks and Governance Shaped Japan's 3/11 Disasters

Gregory Noble's picture
Type: 
Lecture
Date: 
July 24, 2019
Location: 
Japan
Subject Fields: 
Japanese History / Studies, Political Science, Public Health, Sociology

 

The Contemporary Japan Group at the University of Tokyo’s Institute of Social Science

(ISS, or Shaken), welcomes you to a lecture by

 

Daniel P. Aldrich

(Northeastern University)

 

Black Wave: How Networks and Governance Shaped Japan's 3/11 Disasters
 

DATE AND PLACE

Wednesday, July 24, 2019 from 6:00-7:30 p.m. at Akamon Sōgō Kenkyūtō Room 549, Institute of Social Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus, University of Tokyo

 

ABSTRACT

Despite the devastation caused by the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and 60-foot tsunami that struck Japan in 2011, some 96% of those living and working in the most disaster-stricken region of Tōhoku made it through. Smaller earthquakes and tsunamis have killed far more people in nearby China and India. What accounts for the exceptionally high survival rate? And why is it that some towns and cities in the Tōhoku region have built back more quickly than others? Black Wave illuminates two critical factors that had a direct influence on why survival rates varied so much across the Tōhoku region following the 3/11 disasters and why the rebuilding process has also not moved in lockstep across the region.
 

SPEAKER
Daniel P. Aldrich is Director of the Security and Resilience Studies Program and Professor in political science and public policy at Northeastern University in Boston. Aldrich has published five books, more than 50 peer-reviewed articles, and written op-eds for the New York Times, CNN, and many other media outlets

 

CONTEMPORARY JAPAN GROUP
The ISS Contemporary Japan Group provides English-speaking residents of the Tokyo area with an opportunity to hear cutting-edge research in social science and related policy issues, as well as a venue for researchers and professionals in or visiting Tokyo to present and receive knowledgeable feedback on their latest research projects. Admission is free and advance registration is not required. Everyone is welcome.
For more information, including maps and a list of past lectures, please visit our website:

https://web.iss.u-tokyo.ac.jp/cjg/
or contact
Gregory W. NOBLE (noble@iss.u-tokyo.ac.jp)

 

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