Deadline Extended: The Peculiarity of Black Parenting and Child-Rearing - Call For Papers: ASALH 104th Annual Meeting and Conference October 2 – 6, 2019 -

Stephen Richardson's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
March 1, 2019 to March 15, 2019
Location: 
United States
Subject Fields: 
African American History / Studies, Black History / Studies, Childhood and Education, Slavery, Women's & Gender History / Studies

NAME: Stephen Richardson

UNIVERSITY: Miami University of Ohio

EMAIL: richarsa@miamioh.edu

TITLE OF PANEL: The Peculiarity of Black Child-rearing

 

PANEL ABSTRACT

 

The number of black deaths resulting of police brutality has alarmed the general public. The national awareness and push back against police brutality has particularly been perpetuated by social media and a news frenzy which resulted in calls for policing reforms and responsibility for wrongful deaths. The killing of Trayvon Martin and Tamir Rice reminds us that not only black adults, but black youth are under constant threat of racist violence. Although these injustices sparked recent unrest, these acts were not unknown for black parents. These social and racial patterns that threatens the lives of African American youth lead black parents to raise their children differently within a racist society. Historically, this differentiation has led to the well-known parental exercise titled “the talk”. Conducting this “talk” is the task of black parents framing and explaining to their children the truths and dangers of racist violence that lies before them.

This panel seeks to understand black parenting resistance to racism across time. The aim is to chronologically and thematically understand how black parents’ approaches to child-rearing act as mechanisms to challenge racism. In this panel we want to explain the perils and the dilemmas that black parents faced in their efforts to protect and shelter children bounded by discrimination. I will do this by doing a historic analysis on the “the talk”. Studies pertaining to African American family structures, systems of kinship, or class and caste that explain how black children and parents navigated through a world of racism or illuminates the peculiarity of black child-rearing are welcome.

 

Contact Info: 

Stephen Richardson

Miami University of Ohio

richarsa@miamioh.edu

Contact Email: