Adjustments and de-adjustments to the nation and nationalism: 19th-21st century Europe

Sébastien Carney's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
December 5, 2019 to December 6, 2019
Location: 
France
Subject Fields: 
Contemporary History, Nationalism History / Studies

Adjustments and de-adjustments to the nation and
nationalism: 19th-21st century Europe

ABSTRACT
The concept of nationalism, as a process of organising a social and geographical space,
has given rise to a number of works that have now become classics, but what do we know
about the forms of adjustment and de-adjustment to this process? This conference aims to
review the creation of ‘national compositions’ with regard to forms of passivity, couldn’t-careless
attitudes and micro-resistance at the point of exposure to nationhood and/or the
nationalitarist project.

ANNOUNCEMENT
With the support of the Centre de Recherche Bretonne et Celtique (CRBC) at the Université
de Bretagne Occidentale (Brest).
Theme
The following is a classic question that has provided the social sciences with a number
of key works, including the most commonly cited publications of Gellner, Hobsbawm,
Anderson and Thiesse: Does nationalism (in the nationalitarist project sense) still have
something to say about the societies in which it is embedded and that, to a greater or lesser
extent depending on the times, it contributes to shaping? A useful reference point in terms of
developing this question, Joep Leerssen’s synthesis National Thought in Europe: A Cultural History
(Amsterdam University Press, 2006) rather attests that nationalism has nothing to say in this
regard. The suggestion is that nationalism, in its European dimensions, is one of those
outdated old historiographical ideas that invite points of view whose relevance is based on a
number of tried and tested models. Miroslav Hroch’s scansion – the popular ‘unconsciousness’
of the nation/objectivisation of the national idea by minorities with vested interests/state
promotion of a nationalitarist project backed by a social ‘conversion’ enterprise – (European
Nations. Explaining their Formation, Verso, 2015) is part of these interpretative schemes, whose
great merit is that they offer an interpretative framework and allow useful comparisons.
In short, there is agreement on the idea that European states have been involved since
the 19th century in processes of ‘stato-nationalisation’, combining the production of the
nation by the state and the orchestration of the state on behalf of the nation (John Breuilly,
The Oxford Handbook of the History of Nationalism, Oxford University Press, 2016). However,
efforts to define nationalism and circumscribe its most constitutive dimensions remain ongoing
and continuous. Is nationalism integrative or emancipatory even (see Bernard Michel’s book,
Nations et nationalismes en Europe centrale, XIXe-XXe siècle, Aubier, 1996, and Alain Dieckhoff and
Christophe Jaffrelot’s synthesis, Repenser le nationalisme, Presses de Sciences Po, 2006)? Is it
based on an assumption of differentiation by race or arms? Is it an effective fabrication or a
mobilising myth?
Organising a conference on adjustments and de-adjustments to nationalism and the
nation may therefore appear to be a rather cheap provocation. That is obviously not the aim.
And for several reasons. Social science researchers, particularly those working within the
framework of think tanks dedicated to the subject (H-Nationalism, NISE), have tackled this
subject over the past decade by constructing it step by step. In the wake of Rogers Brubaker’s
book on the nation as a ‘contingent reality’ (Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National
Question in the New Europe, Cambridge University Press, 1996) and Tara Zahra’s research
(‘Imagined Noncommunities: National Indifference as a Category of Analysis’, Slavic Review,
Vol. 69, No. 1, 2010, p. 93-119), ‘indifferences to nationalism’, which in this case refer more
to national indifference, or even indifferent nationality, than to indifference to nationalism
itself, have offered an alternative approach to the national question than the prevailing
teleological approach. A recent publication (Maarten van Ginderachter, Jon Fox (ed.), National
indifference and the History of Nationalism in Modern Europe, Routledge, 2019) opportunely
highlighted the merits of a ‘fuzzy concept’, whose effectiveness lies in the possibility of thinking
backwards about the nationalitarist reality. It also pointed out obstacles linked both to its
limited geographical application (roughly speaking, Eastern Europe) and to the fact that it
manifests in heuristically loose forms.
Proposing a reflection in terms of adjustment and de-adjustment therefore involves
trying to better understand how ‘national compositions’ result not so much from an almost
rudimental inertia of populations, individuals and/or social groups faced with sometimes
confused nationalitarist projects (e.g. Jews caught between Zionism and their attachment to
the nation) as from disjointed links. It means highlighting how much the co-production (elite–
mass, broadly speaking) of a national interest presupposes a prior reflection on at least two
things. The first is the conditions under which this idea might be given credence – at the risk
of postulating its existence and, therefore, attempting to measure its gradients (a criticism
levelled at Michael Billig’s foundational work, Banal Nationalism, Sage, 1995). The second is,
assuming that the nation has become a dominant referent, the way in which it is referenced
through conformism, desire for loyalty and allegiance according to varying forms of
intermittence.
Like the term ‘informal politics’, which has afforded us a better perception of the
plasticity of the political space in the wake of Nina Eliasoph’s work (Avoidance of Politics: How
Americans produce apathy in everyday life, Economica, 2010), ‘adjustments and de-adjustments to
nationalism and the nation’ are likely. First, they account for the complexity of a process (that
basically involves progressing from nationalitarianism to the national to nationalism, and vice
versa) whose apparently totalising dimension unduly overshadows what is at its core, namely
the ways in which the least involved actors (the mass) cope with a process in which they are
supposed to participate. The notion therefore invites us to return to the classic questions of the
conscientisation of nationalism and of ‘concernment’ (in the Brunet sense) by organising a
virtual community whose exclusivist project is nurtured by its capacity to obligate and/or
generate support. Second, they ultimately invite us to dimension the national reality to the
production of interests, whose effectiveness is based on a distribution that is never clear. The
forms of (even passive) support or indifference, sometimes proclaimed in the name of an
alternative project (certain internationalisms), presuppose taking into account the ambivalence
of feelings in respect of what constitutes and what is constituted by a national community.
Convening the terms ‘adjustment’ and ‘de-adjustment’ is therefore not a stylistic affectation or
a desperate desire to stand out. It should be seen as an intention to probe as deeply as possible
into the interactions between the dispositions and positions of the actors involved in statonationalisation
processes, which on the surface seem to go straight over their heads.
Several avenues are possible, and these could shape a number of variations on the
subject under discussion. Norbert Elias identified a national habitus (Studien über die Deutschen:
Machtkämpfe und Habitusentwicklung im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert, Suhrkamp, 1989). In what way is
or has this concept been so widely shared that it commits/has committed societies to thinking
of themselves through an analytical framework that makes the nation an operator of
mobilisations? In what way can reluctance or even resistance to its deployment implicitly
‘reveal’ the aporias of individuals or groups conforming to an intellection of the world through
the national(ist) reality? In short, how can we account for the sidelong glances (assuming it is
not essentially a sophisticated form of the ‘couldn’t-care-less’ attitude) that contribute to
producing an extremely tenuous link to a national order, understood as a baseline command?
These fluctuations of interest in the national can be observed in Putin’s Russia, for example,
where the desire to establish a nation-state following the collapse of the Soviet Union is
experiencing a significant revival after a number of failures, particularly under Yeltsin (and his
new ‘national idea’ in 1996). From a distance, this desire, which has been encouraged by the
introduction of the government’s ‘Patriotic Education of the Citizens of the Russian
Federation’ programmes, seems to have been fruitful. However, a field study of nationalism
(called ‘patriotism’ in Russia), which is omnipresent and protean in everyday Russian life,
conducted by the CNRS’s Projet International de Coopération Scientifique team, has
revealed that appropriations and interpretations vary widely according to each individual’s
‘concernment’. This is evidenced by the fact that this patriotism is used for exclusively
pragmatic purposes linked to individual valorisation (such as concern for a professional career,
the search for a source of personal inspiration, prospects for enrichment, the joy of being
active with friends and family, etc.) – ‘a variety of motivations and commitments where the
image of the State and the official patriotic discourse are often secondary and sometimes even
rejected’1. A study of a methodology that will allow us to objectivise adjustment/deadjustment
gradients would be extremely welcome. It will be assumed that exposure to the
national reality and its intimisation vary according to the positions held by the actors’ in social
and political spaces and (the importance of) their assigned and/or claimed identities. It is
suggested that a multiscalar analysis will allow us to characterise regimes of national(ist)
belonging and recognition in light of the actors’ lived experiences. It will also give us an
understanding of how the capacity for indifference can be part of a tactic developed to escape
a system of representations in which the individual does not recognise or no longer recognises
themselves. Examples of this include veterans and post-war generations as well as nationalist
activists who bow out and therefore become defectors of a cause. Moreover, it will enable us
to grasp the links between adjustments/de-adjustments to both the nation and nationalism, on
the one hand, and their political expression in mobilisations inspired, for example, by
internationalism (cf. international volunteering since the 19th century) or pacifism (impacts of
the circulation of models), on the other. Finally, a multiscalar analysis will allow us to decipher
the logics of the nation-state. Aiming to use the national reality as a resource in certain
configurations (especially in times of crisis), the nation-state may come up against forms of
social passivity that combine a ‘deficit’ of national acculturation with efforts (led by influential
minorities) to derealise a nationalism viewed as a competitive market – societies could and can
be subjected to different nationalist ideologies. In short, we are suggesting that the prism
presented here can bring about a paradigm shift.

1 Françoise Daucé, Myriam Désert, Marlène Laruelle, Anne Le Huérou, Kathy Rousselet, ‘Les usages pratiques
du patriotisme en Russie’, Questions de recherche, 32, 2010, p. 1-31.

Submission information
To submit your proposal, please send a summary of one to two pages maximum (excluding
bibliography) along with a provisional title and short bibliography to the two organisers,
Sébastien Carney (sebastiencarney@yahoo.fr) and Laurent Le Gall (llg1848@wanadoo.fr),
before 31 March 2019. The programme will be finalised by 15 April.
We welcome contributions from a variety of disciplines (history, political science, ethnology,
sociology, literary studies, etc.).
The working language will be French. Papers can be presented in French or English.

The conference will take place in Brest (Faculté des Lettres at the Université de Bretagne
Occidentale) on 5 and 6 December 2019.
Publication of the conference proceedings is planned.

Organising committee
• Sébastien Carney, Maître de conférences in contemporary history – Université de
Brest (CRBC)
• Laurent Le Gall, professor of contemporary history – Université de Brest (CRBC)

Scientific committee
• Sébastien Carney, Maître de conferences in contemporary history – Université de
Brest (CRBC)
• Stéphane Gerson, professor of French and French studies – New York University
• Andrea Geniola, co-editor of the journal Nazioni et Regioni – Universitat Autonòma de
Barcelona
• Joep Leerssen, professor of modern history, director of NISE – University of
Amsterdam
• Laurent Le Gall, professor of contemporary history – Université de Brest (CRBC)
Stéphane Michonneau, professor of contemporary history – Université de Lille
(IRHIS)
• Anne-Marie Thiesse, CNRS research director – École Normale Supérieure (Pays
Germaniques)
• Maarten Van Ginderachter, associate professor in the department of history –
Antwerp University

Indicative bibliography
ANDERSON Benedict, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, New
York, Verso, 1983.
BILLIG Michael, Banal Nationalism, London, Sage, 1995.
BOLIN Per, Christina DOUGLAS, ‘National indifference in the Baltic territories? A critical
assessment’, Journal of Baltic Studies, 48, 1, 2017, p. 13-22.
BREUILLY John, The Oxford Handbook of the History of Nationalism, Oxford, Oxford University
Press, 2016.
BRUBAKER Rogers, Nationalism Reframed. Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe,
Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1996.
DIECKHOFF Alain, JAFFRELOT Christophe, Repenser le nationalisme, Paris, Presses de Sciences
Po, 2006.
ELIAS NORBERT, Studien über die Deutschen: Machtkämpfe und Habitusentwicklung im 19. und 20.
Jahrhundert, Suhrkamp, 1989.
ELIASOPH Nina, L’évitement du politique. Comment les Américains produisent l’apathie dans la vie
quotidienne, Economica, 2010 [1998].
FEEST David, ‘Spaces of “national indifference” in biographic research on citizens of the
Baltic republics 1918-1940’, Journal of Baltic Studies, 48, 1, 2017, p. 55-66.
FORD Caroline, De la province à la nation. Religion et identité politique en Bretagne, Rennes, PUR,
2018 [1993].
GELLNER Ernst, Nations and Nationalism, Ithaca, Cornel University Presse, 1983.
GERSON Stéphane, The Pride of Place Local Memories and Political Culture in Nineteenth-Century
France, Ithaca, Cornel University Press, 2003.
HOBSBAWM Eric, Nations et nationalisme depuis 1780, Paris, Gallimard, 1992.
HROCH Miroslav, European Nations Explaining their Formation, New York, Verso, 2015.
JAKOUBEK Marek, ‘On the process of national indifferentiation: the case of Bulgarian
“Czechs”’, Nations and Nationalism, 24, 2, 2018, p. 369-389.
LEERSSEN Joep, National Thought in Europe A Cultural History, Amsterdam, Amsterdam
University Press, 2006.
LEUSTEAN Lucian N., ‘Eastern Orthodoxy and national indifference in Habsburg Bukovina,
1774–1873’, Nations and Nationalism, 24, 4, 2018, p. 1117-1141.
MARTIGNY Vincent (ed.), ‘Nationalismes ordinaires’, Raisons politiques, no. 37, 2010.
MICHEL Bernard, Nations et nationalismes en Europe centrale, XIXe-XXe siècle, Paris, Aubier, 1996.
STOURZH Gerald, ‘The Ethnicizing of Politics and “National Indifference” in Late Imperial
Austria’, inGerald Stourzh (ed.) Der Umfang der österreichischen Geschichte. Ausgewählte Studien 1990-
2010, Vienna, Böhlau, 2011, p. 283-323.
THIESSE Anne-Marie, La création des identités nationales, Europe XVIIIe-XIXe siècle, Paris, Le Seuil,
1999.
VAN GINDERACHTER Maarten, BEYEN Marnix (ed.) Nationhood from below. Europe in the long
nineteenth century. Basingstoke, Palgrave-Macmillan, 2012.
VAN GINDERACHTER Maarten, How to gauge banal nationalism and national indifference in
the past: proletarian tweets in Belgium’s belle époque, Nations and Nationalism, 24, 3, 2018,
p. 579-593.
VAN GINDERACHTER Maarten, FOX Jon (ed.), National indifference and the History of Nationalism in
Modern Europe, London, Routledge, 2019.
ZAHRA Tara, ‘Imagined Noncommunities: National Indifference as a Category of Analysis’,
Slavic Review, 69, 1, 2010, p. 93-119.

 

Ajustements et désajustements à la nation et au nationalisme
Europe, XIXe-XXIe siècle

 

RESUME
Si le nationalisme, comme processus de mise en ordre d’un espace social et
géographique, a donné matière à des ouvrages dorénavant classiques, que savons-nous des
formes d’ajustement et de désajustement à ce processus ? Ce colloque entend faire le point sur
la constitution des « compositions nationales » à l’aune des formes de passivité, « je-m’enfichisme
» ou de micro-résistance à l’endroit de l’exposition au fait national et/ou au projet
nationalitaire.

ANNONCE
Avec le soutien du Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique (CRBC) de l’Université de
Bretagne Occidentale (Brest).

Argumentaire
Objet on ne peut plus classique qui a offert aux sciences sociales un certain nombre
d’ouvrages séminaux dont ceux, les plus couramment cités, du quatuor Gellner-Hobsbawm-
Anderson-Thiesse, le nationalisme (dans son acception de projet nationalitaire) aurait-il
encore quelque chose à dire sur les sociétés dans lesquelles il s’insère et qu’il contribue peu ou
prou, en fonction des moments, à conformer ? Utile comme mise au point, la synthèse de Joep
Leerssen, National Thought in Europe. A Cultural History (Amstersdam University Press, 2006)
atteste plutôt le contraire, comme si le nationalisme, dans ses dimensions européennes, relevait
de ces vieilles lunes historiographiques qui convoquent des points de vue dont la pertinence est
gagée sur un certain nombre de modèles dûment éprouvés. En l’espèce, on rappellera ici que
la scansion de Miroslav Hroch – « inconscience » populaire de la nation/objectivation de
l’idée nationale par des minorités qui y ont leurs intérêts/promotion étatique d’un projet
nationalitaire adossé à une entreprise de « conversion » sociale – (European Nations. Explaining
their Formation, Verso, 2015) relève de ces schèmes interprétatifs qui ont le grand mérite d’offrir
une grille interprétative et de permettre d’utiles comparaisons.
En bref, l’on s’accorde donc sur l’idée que les États européens ont été impliqués depuis
le XIXe siècle dans des processus de stato-nationalisation mêlant production de la nation par
l’État et instrumentation de l’État au nom de la nation (John Breuilly, The Oxford Handbook of
the History of Nationalism, Oxford University Press, 2016). Que le nationalisme soit intégrateur
voire émancipateur (cf. l’ouvrage de Bernard Michel, Nations et nationalismes en Europe centrale,
XIXe-XXe siècle, Aubier, 1996 et la synthèse d’Alain Dieckhoff et Christophe Jaffrelot, Repenser le
nationalisme, Presses de Sciences Po, 2006) ou qu’il relève d’une assomption de la
différenciation par la race ou les armes, qu’il ressortisse à une fiction efficace ou à un mythe
mobilisateur, force est de constater qu’il ne cesse de faire couler de l’encre aux fins de le
définir et d’en circonscrire ses dimensions les plus constitutives. Proposer une rencontre sur les ajustements et les désajustements au nationalisme et à la nation peut apparaître dès lors comme une provocation à peu de frais. Tel n’est
évidemment pas le but. Pour plusieurs raisons. L’on rappellera que des chercheurs en sciences
sociales, notamment dans le cadre de certains groupes de réflexion qui lui sont dédiés (HNationalism,
Nise), se sont emparés, depuis une dizaine d’années, de cet objet en le
construisant pas à pas. Dans la foulée de l’ouvrage de Rogers Brubaker sur la nation comme
« fait contingent » (Nationalism Reframed. Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe,
Cambridge University Press, 1996) puis des travaux de Tara Zahra (« Imagined
Noncommunities : National Indifference as a Category of Analysis », Slavic Review, vol. 69,
n° 1, 2010, p. 93-119), les « indifférences au nationalisme », qui renvoient davantage en
l’espèce à l’indifférence nationale, voire à la nationalité indifférente qu’à l’indifférence au
nationalisme à proprement parler, ont offert d’aborder la question nationale autrement que
telle qu’elle continue de prévaloir couramment sous la forme d’une téléologie de la nation. Un
ouvrage récent (Maarten van Ginderachter, Jon Fox (dir.), National indifference and the History of
Nationalism in Modern Europe, Routledge, 2019) vient opportunément souligner les mérites d’un
« concept flou » dont l’efficacité relève de la possibilité de penser à rebours le fait
nationalitaire tout comme il pointe des écueils liés à la fois à son application géographique
limitée (en gros, l’Europe de l’est) et à sa déclinaison sous des formes heuristiquement
relâchées.
Proposer dès lors de réfléchir en termes d’ajustement et de désajustement, c’est tenter
de mieux cerner comment les « compositions nationales » relèvent moins d’une inertie quasi
principielle de populations, d’individus et/ou de groupes sociaux, à des projets nationalitaires
qui se télescopèrent quelquefois (les Juifs entre sionisme et attachements à la nation), que de
traits d’union en pointillé. C’est souligner combien la coproduction (élites-masse en gros) d’un
intérêt pour la nation suppose que l’on réfléchisse au moins à deux choses en amont : d’abord,
aux conditions de possibilité d’un crédit porté à l’incarnation de cette idée – au risque de
postuler son existence et, partant, de tenter d’en mesurer des gradients (reproche fait au travail
fondateur de Michael Billig, Banal Nationalism, Sage, 1995) – ; ensuite, si tant est que la nation
fût devenue un référent dominant, à la manière dont cette dernière se fait référence par
conformisme, désir de loyauté ou d’allégeance selon des formes de plus ou moins grande
intermittence.
À l’instar du syntagme « politique informelle » qui, dans le sillage des travaux de Nina
Eliasoph (L’évitement du politique. Comment les Américains produisent l’apathie dans la vie quotidienne,
Economica, 2010), offre de mieux percevoir la plasticité de l’espace politique, les
« ajustements et désajustements au nationalisme et à la nation » sont susceptibles, en premier
lieu, de rendre compte de la complexité d’un processus (en gros du nationalitaire au national
puis au nationalisme et inversement) dont la dimension apparemment totalisante occulte par
trop ce qui est en son coeur : les façons dont les acteurs les moins impliqués (soit la masse) se
débrouillent avec un processus auquel ils sont censés participer. La notion invite dès lors à
revenir sur les questions classiques de la conscientisation du nationalisme, du
« concernement » par la mise en ordre d’une communauté virtuelle dont le projet exclusiviste
se nourrit de sa capacité à obliger et/ou à générer de l’adhésion. En second lieu, ils invitent in
fine à dimensionner le fait national à la production d’intérêts dont l’effectivité repose sur un
partage qui n’est jamais gagné d’avance tant les formes d’adhésion, même passives, ou
d’indifférence quelquefois proclamée au nom d’un projet alternatif (certains
internationalismes) supposent de tenir compte de l’ambivalence des sentiments à l’égard de ce
qui constitue et que constitue une communauté nationale. Convoquer les termes d’ajustement
et de désajustement ne relève donc pas d’une afféterie stylistique ou d’un souhait de se
démarquer à tout prix. L’on y verra la volonté de sonder au plus près les interactions entre
dispositions et positions des acteurs impliqués dans des processus de stato-nationalisation qui
semblent à première vue les dépasser.
Plusieurs pistes sont envisageables qui pourraient former autant de déclinaisons de
l’objet soumis à la discussion. Norbert Elias a identifié un habitus national (Studien über die
Deutschen: Machtkämpfe und Habitusentwicklung im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert, Suhrkamp, 1989). En
quoi ce dernier est et fut-il à ce point communément partagé qu’il engage(a) des sociétés à se
penser à travers une grille d’analyse faisant de la nation un opérateur de mobilisations ? En
quoi des réticences voire des résistances à son déploiement peuvent-elles « révéler » en creux
les apories de la conformation des individus voire des groupes à une intellection du monde via
le fait national(iste) ? En bref, comment rendre compte des regards obliques – si tant est qu’il
ne s’agisse pas avant tout d’une forme plus ou moins élaborée de « je-m’en-fichisme » – qui
contribuent à produire un lien extrêmement ténu à un ordre national entendu comme un
ordre de référence ? On observe par exemple ces fluctuations de l’intérêt au national dans la
Russie de Poutine, où la volonté d’instaurer un État-nation suite à l’effondrement de l’URSS
connaît un regain important après divers échecs, notamment sous Eltsine (la nouvelle « idée
nationale » en 1996). Vue de loin, cette volonté, favorisée par l’adoption des programmes
gouvernementaux d’« Éducation patriotique des citoyens de la Fédération de Russie », semble
avoir porté ses fruits. Or, menée sur le terrain par l’équipe du Projet international de
coopération scientifique (PICS) du CNRS, une étude du nationalisme – là-bas appelé
« patriotisme » –, omniprésent et proétiforme au quotidien, fait état d’une grande variété
d’appropriations et d’interprétations en fonction du « concernement » de chacun. En
témoigne l’utilisation de ce patriotisme à des fins exclusivement pragmatiques, liées à une
valorisation individuelle : souci de la carrière professionnelle, recherche d’une source
d’inspiration personnelle, perspectives d’enrichissement, plaisir de l’action avec ses amis et ses
proches…) – « une variété de motivations et d’engagements où l’image de l’État et le discours
patriotique officiel sont souvent secondaires, parfois même rejetés2 ». Un questionnement sur
une méthodologie permettant d’objectiver des gradients d’ajustement/désajustement serait
pour le moins bienvenu. L’on supposera en effet que l’exposition au fait national et son
intimisation varient en fonction des positions qu’occupent les acteurs dans les espaces social et
politique, eu égard à leurs identités assignées et/ou revendiquées (importance des , et l’on
suggérera qu’une analyse multiscalaire permettra de qualifier des régimes d’appartenance et
de reconnaissance nationales/istes à l’aune des expériences vécues par les acteurs. Il en va
ainsi de la possibilité de comprendre comment la capacité à l’indifférence peut relever de
tactiques mises au point pour échapper à un système de représentations dans lequel l’on ne se
reconnaît pas ou plus – on songe ici aux anciens combattants et aux générations des aprèsguerres
mais aussi aux militants nationalistes qui tirent leur révérence devenant, ce faisant, les
transfuges d’une cause. Il en va aussi de notre capacité à saisir les liens entre
ajustements/désajustements à la nation et au nationalisme et traduction politique dans des
mobilisations qui relèvent, par exemple, de l’internationalisme (cf. le volontariat international
dès le XIXe siècle) ou du pacifisme (impacts de la circulation des modèles). Il en va enfin de
notre aptitude à décrypter les logiques de l’État-nation qui, visant à utiliser le fait national
comme une ressource dans certaines configurations (en temps de crise tout particulièrement),
peuvent se heurter à des formes de passivité sociale combinant un « déficit » d’acculturation
nationale et des efforts (portés par des minorités agissantes) de déréalisation d’un nationalisme
envisagé comme un marché concurrentiel – des sociétés purent et peuvent être soumises à
différentes idéologies nationalistes. En bref, nous suggérons que ce prisme peut amener à
déplacer le curseur.

2 Françoise Daucé, Myriam Désert, Marlène Laruelle, Anne Le Huérou, Kathy Rousselet, « Les usages pratiques
du patriotisme en Russie », Questions de recherche, 32, 2010, p. 1-31.
 

Conditions de soumission
Pour soumettre votre proposition de communication, merci d’adresser aux deux
organisateurs, Sébastien Carney (sebastiencarney@yahoo.fr) et Laurent Le Gall
(llg1848@wanadoo.fr) , un résumé de une à deux pages maximum (hors bibliographie)
accompagné d’un titre provisoire et d’une courte bibliographie avant le 31 mars 2019. Le
programme sera établi pour le 15 avril.
Nous accueillons des contributions venues de plusieurs disciplines (histoire, science politique,
ethnologie, sociologie, études littéraires…).
La langue de travail sera le français, les papiers peuvent être présentés en français et en
anglais.
Le colloque aura lieu à Brest (faculté des lettres de l’Université de Bretagne Occidentale) les 5
et 6 décembre 2019.
Une publication est prévue à la suite de la rencontre.

Comité d’organisation
• Sébastien Carney, Maître de conférences en histoire contemporaine – Université de
Brest (CRBC)
• Laurent Le Gall, Professeur d’histoire contemporaine – Université de Brest (CRBC)

Comité scientifique
• Sébastien Carney, Maître de conférences en histoire contemporaine – Université de
Brest (CRBC)
• Stéphane Gerson, Professor of French and French Studies – New York University
• Andrea Geniola, Co-editor of the Journal Nazioni et Regioni – Universitat autonòma de
Barcelona
• Joep Leerssen, Professeur d’histoire moderne, directeur de Nise – Université
d’Amsterdam
• Laurent Le Gall, Professeur d’histoire contemporaine – Université de Brest (CRBC)
• Stéphane Michonneau, Professeur d’histoire contemporaine – Université de Lille
(IRHIS)
• Anne-Marie Thiesse, Directrice de recherche au CNRS – École normale supérieure
(Pays Germaniques)
• Maarten Van Ginderachter, Associate Professor at the Department of History –
Antwerp University

Bibliographie indicative
ANDERSON Benedict, Imagined Communities. Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, New
York, Verso, 1983.
BILLIG Michael, Banal Nationalism, Londres, Sage, 1995.
BOLIN Per, Christina DOUGLAS, « National indifference’ in the Baltic territories ? A critical
assessment », Journal of Baltic Studies, 48, 1, 2017, p. 13-22.
BREUILLY John, The Oxford Handbook of the History of Nationalism, Oxford, Oxford University
Press, 2016.
BRUBAKER Rogers, Nationalism Reframed. Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe,
Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1996.
DIECKHOFF Alain, JAFFRELOT Christophe, Repenser le nationalisme, Paris, Presses de Sciences
Po, 2006.
ELIAS NORBERT, Studien über die Deutschen: Machtkämpfe und Habitusentwicklung im 19. und 20.
Jahrhundert, Suhrkamp, 1989.
ELIASOPH Nina, L’évitement du politique. Comment les Américains produisent l’apathie dans la vie
quotidienne, Economica, 2010 [1998].
FEEST David, « Spaces of ‘national indifference’ in biographic research on citizens of the
Baltic republics 1918-1940 », Journal of Baltic Studies, 48, 1, 2017, p. 55-66.
FORD Caroline, De la province à la nation. Religion et identité politique en Bretagne, Rennes, PUR,
2018 [1993].
GELLNER Ernst, Nations and Nationalism, Ithaca, Cornel University Presse, 1983.
GERSON Stéphane, The Pride of Place. Local Memories and Political Culture in Nineteenth-Century
France, Ithaca, Cornel University Presse, 2003.
HOBSBAWM Eric, Nations et nationalisme depuis 1780, Paris, Gallimard, 1992.
HROCH Miroslav, European Nations. Explaining their Formation, New York, Verso, 2015.
JAKOUBEK Marek, « On the process of national indifferentiation : the case of Bulgarian
‘Czechs’ », Nations and Nationalism, 24, 2, 2018, p. 369-389.
LEERSSEN Joep, National Thought in Europe. A Cultural History, Amsterdam, Amstersdam
University Press, 2006.
LEUSTEAN Lucian N., « Eastern Orthodoxy and national indifference in Habsburg Bukovina,
1774–1873 », Nations and Nationalism, 24, 4, 2018, p. 1117-1141.
MARTIGNY Vincent (dir.), « Nationalismes ordinaires », Raisons politiques, n° 37, 2010.
MICHEL Bernard, Nations et nationalismes en Europe centrale, XIXe-XXe siècle, Paris, Aubier, 1996.
STOURZH Gerald, « The Ethnicizing of Politics and ‘National Indifference’ in Late Imperial
Austria », dans Gerald Stourzh (dir.) Der Umfang der österreichischen Geschichte. Ausgewählte Studien
1990-2010, Vienne, Böhlau, 2011, p. 283-323.
THIESSE Anne-Marie, La création des identités nationales, Europe XVIIIe-XIXe siècle, Paris, Le Seuil,
1999.
VAN GINDERACHTER Maarten, BEYEN Marnix (dir.) Nationhood from below. Europe in the long
nineteenth century. Basingstoke, Palgrave-Macmillan, 2012.
VAN GINDERACHTER Maarten, « How to gauge banal nationalism and national indifference
in the past: proletarian tweets in Belgium’s belle époque », Nations and Nationalism, 24, 3, 2018,
p. 579-593.
VAN GINDERACHTER Maarten, FOX Jon (dir.), National indifference and the History of Nationalism
in Modern Europe, Londres, Routledge, 2019.
ZAHRA Tara, « Imagined Noncommunities : National Indifference as a Category of
Analysis », Slavic Review, 69, 1, 2010, p. 93-119.

Contact Email: