Call for papers - European Conference of African Studies, 12-14 June - Panel "Religion, citizenship and everyday practices in Africa"

Alessandro Gusman's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
January 12, 2019 to January 21, 2019
Location: 
United Kingdom
Subject Fields: 
African History / Studies, Anthropology, Religious Studies and Theology

European Conference of African Studies (ECAS), Edinburgh 12-14 June 2019

REL07: "Religion, citizenship and everyday practices in Africa"

Convenors

    Alessandro Gusman (University of Turin) 

    Henni Alava (University of Jyväskylä) 
 

Short abstract

This panel extends understanding of the nexus between religion and citizenship in contemporary Africa by exploring how "religious citizenship" is formed through everyday practices and outside of explicitly political or religious arenas.

Long abstract

This panel extends understanding of the nexus between religion and citizenship in contemporary Africa by exploring how "religious citizenship" is formed through everyday practices and outside of explicitly political or religious arenas.

A focus on citizenship highlights the double role of religion as both an engine of social change, and a carrier of continuity. While schools and political parties affiliated with religious groups have historically nurtured ideas and practices of citizenship that continue to structure public debate, religion has also been a central source of disruption. In the 21st Century, new movements in Christianity and Islam have introduced radical lexicons of 'moral citizenship' (Bompani and Valois 2017), and contributed to transforming the ways in which networks of kinship, business, and politics are organised.

But where does religion wield its influence on ideas of citizenship, and how? We suggest looking not only to formal arenas of civic education (churches, mosques, schools or political rallies), but to 'less obvious' spaces and processes: the ways in which ideas and practices of the morally good citizen are constructed in the everyday (Lambek 2010), to disruptions that alter habituated citizenship practices (Dewey 1916), or to how religion contributes to the tactics people employ to engage with the powers that structure their lives (de Certeau 2011). Such views open possibilities for analysis emerging from diverse empirical settings. While most of the published research on these themes has focused on Islam and Christianity, we encourage researchers working on any religious tradition to share their empirically-grounded insights.

The deadline to submit abstracts is January 21, via the conference system: https://ecasconference.org/2019/home