CfP: NYU German Graduate Conference 'Movement(s)'

Leonie Ettinger's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
April 25, 2019 to April 26, 2019
Location: 
New York, United States
Subject Fields: 
German History / Studies, Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Literature, Philosophy, Theatre & Performance History / Studies

CALL FOR PAPERS

NYU GERMAN, APRIL 25-26, 2019

'MOVEMENT(S)'

WITH A KEYNOTE BY JOHN T. HAMILTON

At least since Hegel, ‘movement’ has served as a driving force for understanding history, aesthetics, and ontology. Even those thinkers who departed from the position of ‘absolute Spirit’ remained committed to Hegel’s notion of a world ‘never at rest, but always in motion.’ Marx’s dialectical materialism gave rise to a framework for understanding the ‘fluid movement’ of concrete social and aesthetic forms (Lukács, Bakhtin, Adorno, Jameson). Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, and their revenants put metaphysics itself ‘in motion’ by ‘inventing vibrations, rotations, whirlings, gravitations, dances or leaps’ (Deleuze) that relate movement immediately back to itself.

In the 21st century, movement is becoming an ever more central concept for critical analysis in various fields. Increasing tempos of urban life, transportation, information, and migration have led to a ‘mobility turn’ in the social sciences (John Urry, Mimi Sheller), philosophy (Thomas Nail), and literary studies (Ottmar Ette, Birgit Neumann, Dirk Oschmann). Physicist Sarah Demers and former New York City Ballet member Emily Coates are set to publish their collaborative study Physics and Dance next year. Recent visualization and mapping projects in the digital humanities (Barbara Hui, Emily Fuhrman) are opening new avenues for modeling the poetic, syntactic, and historic movement of text(s). In contemporary German studies, a renewed appreciation for Goethe’s morphology is invigorating research into movement’s primary role in the (self-)production of aesthetic forms. Juliane Vogel’s Aus dem Grund (2018), to take the most recent example, reconsiders dramatic form as an effect of motions onto and off the stage.

‘Movement,’ we suggest, is anything but a static concept, confined to a single definition or paradigm of interpretation. Rather, it is a concept on the move: an implicitly plural, essentially mobile notion demanding a supple approach from many sides. We thus invite scholars from a wide range of disciplines to join us in moving toward, or with, movement.

SUBMISSIONS

Presentations should be no longer than 20 minutes in length. Please send a 300-word abstract and short bio to movement.nyu@gmail.com by January 15th, 2019. We invite submissions from graduate, doctoral, and postdoctoral researchers in German studies and related fields, including but not limited to: literary studies, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, gender studies, critical race theory, political theory, history, religion, film and media studies, theater and performance, musicology, art history, and history of science.

OTHER THEMES TO CONSIDER :

➢ Dynamic form in aesthetics, poetics, and genre theory

➢ Social, political, artistic, and intellectual ‘movements’

➢ Performative writing and the writing of performance

➢ Stagnations, stalemates, slip-ups, and false steps

➢ Transportation, urbanization, technicization

➢ Translations, citations, transmediations

➢ Travel literature; migration literature

➢ Borders, boundaries, liminal spaces

➢ Thought and walking; the flâneur

➢ Mobile bodies, fluid identities

➢ Theater, film, music, dance

➢ Process philosophies

➢ (Dis)Appearances

➢ Nomadism

 

ORGANIZERS: SIMON SCHOCH, LEONIE ETTINGER, BENJAMIN D. SCHLUTER

Contact Email: