Workshop CFP: Children, Youth and Labor on the Eve of Independence

Robin Chapdelaine's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
November 2, 2018
Location: 
Pennsylvania, United States
Subject Fields: 
Atlantic History / Studies, Childhood and Education, Colonial and Post-Colonial History / Studies, Labor History / Studies, Slavery

Robin P. Chapdelaine and Lara Putnam are seeking contributors for an edited collection or journal special issue focused on child labor during the years leading up to independence in various colonies. We invite scholars to submit a 400 word abstract and CV to duqyouthlabor@gmail.com by November 2nd, 2018. The 2-day workshop will be held March 29th-30th.

Contact Info: 

Hosted by Duquesne University, Department of History and The Center for African Studies
Co-sponsored by University of Pittsburgh, Department of History

Deadline for proposal submission: November 2nd, 2018
 
Robin P. Chapdelaine and Lara Putnam are seeking contributors for an edited collection or journal special issue focused on child labor during the years leading up to independence in various colonies. We invite scholars to submit a 400 word abstract and CV to duqyouthlabor@gmail.com by November 2nd, 2018. The 2-day workshop will be held March 29th-30th. The aim of the project is to reflect the various ways in which adults and children interpreted the work performed by children and youth throughout the colonies. In recent years, scholarship on children, youth and labor throughout the ‘Empire’ has increased substantially. Often, discussions about child labor, in a colonial context, focus on child slavery, child trafficking and exploitation. While it is true that various forms of colonial labor forcibly incorporated children, what is unclear is how children and adolescents related their work to the colonial state. Taking into consideration that children were indoctrinated to become productive and patriotic citizens through engaging in social activities, clubs, schooling and religion-how then did they understand their labor as a form of (imperialistic) nationalism? Or did their work represent autonomy, agency and perhaps anti-imperial efforts? In what other ways was child labor understood?
 
- Geographic location is not limited.
- Labor is broadly defined, as is the time frame.
- Analyses that focus on class, gender and masculinity are encouraged.
- A re-consideration/articulation of patriotism, nationalism, citizens, subjects and labor
  is also encouraged.
 
A limit of 20 proposals will be accepted. Papers will be pre-circulated among the participants and need to be submitted by February 22, 2019.

Selected papers will be published in a peer-reviewed edited volume or special journal issue.

Don’t hesitate to forward this CFP.  Please email duqyouthlabor@gmail.com with any questions you may have.

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