Call for Papers: De-centering the Global Middle Ages

Paula Curtis's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
February 8, 2019 to February 9, 2019
Location: 
Michigan, United States
Subject Fields: 
African History / Studies, Asian History / Studies, Medieval and Byzantine History / Studies, Pre-Columbian History / Studies, World History / Studies

Dear colleagues,

 
With apologies for cross-posting. I would like to bring to your attention a two-day symposium being held at the University of Michigan Feb 8-9, 2019, entitled "De-centering the Global Middle Ages." This symposium will be an opportunity to examine conceptualizations of the "medieval' and "Middle Ages" across regional fields and specializations through research and primary source-based lightning talks and presentations that highlight global connectivity and mobility c. 500-1600 CE. Please see the full call for papers below and feel free to contact us directly with any questions.
 
Best,
 
Paula
 
-- 
Paula R. Curtis
PhD Candidate
Department of History
University of Michigan
======
 

De-centering the Global Middle Ages

February 8-9, 2019, University of Michigan

 

The Department of History and Medieval and Early Modern Studies Program at the University of Michigan invite proposals for a February 8-9, 2019 symposium, “De-centering the Global Middle Ages.”

 

This symposium will contribute to the burgeoning body of scholarship on the meaning of the “medieval” and “Middle Ages” in increasingly interdisciplinary and cross-regional conceptions of the premodern world.

 

This symposium invites researchers to consider scholarly perspectives of the “global Middle Ages” by presenting research and resources that address the connectivity and mobility of the globe c. 500-1600 CE. What work does the idea of “the Middle Ages” do in our scholarship, and what do we gain from a shared or comparative notion of the medieval? Papers and presentations will aim to contribute to a more inclusive view of the premodern world that de-centers European interpretations of the Middle Ages and recognizes dynamic globalisms. A keynote address will be delivered by Valerie Hansen (Stanley Woodward Professor of History, Yale University), specialist in premodern China and Silk Road Studies, whose current book project is entitled: The World in the Year 1000: When Globalization Began.

 

Faculty and graduate students are welcome to apply to deliver a lightning talk + complementary paper and/or a primary source-based research presentation. Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words.

 

Lightning Talks

 

The symposium will hold two panels of lightning talks (8 minutes each) based on short, pre-circulated papers (approx. 4 pages) summarizing current work on globalized conceptions of and connections within the medieval world. Lightning talks will engage field- or region-specific conceptualizations of “the medieval/Middle Ages.”

 

Roundtable discussions with respondents will follow.

 

Primary Source-based Research Presentations

 

Submissions will also be accepted for 15- to 18-minute research presentations, each focused on a particular medieval primary source (text, image, object, etc.) that is useful for thinking in comparative or global perspectives. The source (an image or a selection from the source) should be pre-circulated to attendees.

 

Each talk will be followed by a moderated discussion.

 

All presenters are asked to submit a brief bibliography (5-10 entries) on resources related to their lightning talks or research presentations. After the symposium, these bibliographies will be uploaded to the Global Middle Ages Project website (http://globalmiddleages.org/, University of Texas at Austin) and contribute to the development of a canon of literature on the global Middle Ages.

 

Deadline:        September 17, 2018

 

How to Apply:

 

Applications should be submitted in PDF form to conference organizers Paula R. Curtis (prcurtis@umich.edu) and Amanda Respess (arespess@umich.edu by September 17. Those submitting both lightning talks and primary source presentations should prepare separate abstracts. Please include the following information:

 

Name:

Affiliation:

Faculty/Graduate Student/Independent Scholar:

Field:

Regional Specialization:

Proposed Format (Lightning Talk/Primary Source Presentation):

Abstracts of no longer than 300 words.

 

Notifications of acceptance will be made by no later than October 15, 2018.

 

This symposium is made possible by the generous support of the University of Michigan Department of History, Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, History of Art Department, Department of English Language & Literature, Asian Languages and Cultures Department, Slavic Languages & Literatures Department, Near Eastern Studies Department, Center for Japanese Studies, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies, Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies, Forum on Research in Medieval Studies, and the Japanese Studies Interdisciplinary Colloquium.

Contact Email: