“I’m a Negro” who is also a nurse: Gloria Clark Baylis and the Queen Elizabeth Hotel

Elisa Stroh's picture
Type: 
Seminar
Date: 
September 20, 2017
Location: 
Pennsylvania, United States
Subject Fields: 
Black History / Studies, Canadian History / Studies, Health and Health Care, History of Science, Medicine, and Technology
“I’m a Negro” who is also a nurse: Gloria Clark Baylis and the Queen Elizabeth Hotel
TIME:
4:00pm EDT
LOCATION:
Claire Fagin Hall, Room 2019
418 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia PA, 19104
 
Join Bates Center seminar speaker Karen Flynn, PhD, as she examines the case of Gloria Clark Baylis and the Queen Elizabeth Hotel. Flynn’s analysis of this case reveals the complexity and mutual interrelationship of social relations at work in what we call race-based discrimination.

Speaker: Karen Flynn, PhD, Associate professor, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, Department of African-American Studies Program, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Abstract:

On April 2, 1965, Judge Marcel Gabor of Montreal’s Court of Sessions asked Gloria Clark Baylis, a British-trained nurse, to identify her race. She replied: “I’m a Negro.” Baylis, in conjunction with the Negro Citizenship Association (NCA), had filed a lawsuit against the Queen Elizabeth Hotel for discrimination based on race. Her Majesty the Queen, Complainant vs Hilton of Canada, Ltd was the first case of its kind. An analysis of this case reveals the complexity and mutual interrelationship of social relations at work in what we call race-based discrimination. This presentation draws on Baylis’s case to make an argument for intersectionality as an analytical and theoretical framework. It moves beyond the tendency to use intersectionality as a formula, and instead makes concrete its usefulness to nursing history.   


Karen Flynn is an Associate professor in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies and the Department of African-American Studies Program at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She received her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies from York University, Toronto, Ontario, in 2003. Her research interests include migration and travel, Black Canada, health, popular culture, feminist, Diasporic and post-colonial studies. Dr. Flynn’s recent book: Moving Beyond Borders: Black Canadian and Caribbean women in the African Canadian Diaspora is by the University of Toronto Press. Moving Beyond Borders won the Lavinia L. Dock Award from the American Association of the History of Nursing.  She is currently working on a second book project that maps the travel itineraries of Blacks across borders. 

In addition to her scholarly publications, Dr. Flynn has published numerous editorials in Share, Canada’s largest ethnic newspaper, which serves the Black & Caribbean communities in the Greater Metropolitan Toronto area. Dr. Flynn has had oped articles in Now Magazine, the Toronto Star, and Rabble.ca. She was also a free-lance writer for Canada Extra, and most recently for Swaymag.ca where she wrote passionately about contemporary issues considering issues of race, gender, class, sexuality, age, and nation. Dr. Flynn was recently a Dean’s Fellow for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS), a program geared towards strengthening and expanding the cadre of leaders in the College. In 2015, Dr. Flynn was selected as the Conrad Humanities Fellow for LAS for excellence in scholarship.

Contact Info: 

Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing

(215) 898-4502

www.nursing.upenn.edu/history