Fearfully and Wonderfully Made: Modifying the Black (Self) Body through Science and Technology, a Historical and Social Context

Melvin G. Hill's picture
Type: 
Call for Papers
Date: 
June 19, 2017 to September 1, 2017
Location: 
Tennessee, United States
Subject Fields: 
African American History / Studies, Philosophy, Religious Studies and Theology, Sexuality Studies, Women's & Gender History / Studies

 

Chapter proposals are invited for the edited book Fearfully and Wonderfully Made: Modifying the Black (Self) Body through Science and Technology, a Historical and Social Context. This volume will explore and examine post- and transhuman blackness in African American literature and critical thought. The central premise of the collection is to look at post- and transhuman blackness through the imagination and critical thought of African American writers and thinkers whose contributions to the post- and transhuman discussion may not have received the necessary and well-deserved attention. Contributions from a wide range of disciplines are welcomed. A non-exhaustive series of topics and analyses of post- and transhuman blackness include but not limited to:

 

• What is Post- and Transhuman Blackness?

• Philosophical issues

• Engaging Technologies

• Religion and Theology

• Human enhancement

• Slave Narratives and Miscegenation

• Representation of post- and transhuman performance

 

A wide range of authors will be considered for the collection including Martin Delany, Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Jean Toomer, George S. Schuyler, Francis E. W. Harper, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, Samuel R. Delany, Octavia Butler, and Alicia Michaels. However, other authors are certainly welcomed.

 

Fearfully and Wonderfully Made: Modifying the Black (Self) Body through Science and Technology, a Historical and Social Context is historically grounded and socially charged as it seeks to provide careful analysis and engaging interpretation of the importance of post- and transhumanism by drawing on specifically African American visions, imagination, and critical perspectives.

 

Interested authors should send a 300-word abstract and 200-word biography to mhill33@utm.edu by September 1, 2017. Contributors will be contacted by October 1, 2017, with anticipation for completed chapter drafts by March 1, 2018.

Contact Info: 

Melvin G. Hill, Ph.D.

Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages

University of Tennessee, Martin

 

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